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Super Tuesday results help Romney campaign

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgIn the wake of the Super Tuesday presidential primaries and caucuses, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney’s close Ohio Republican primary win saved him from potential “disaster,” former political columnist for the South Bend Tribune and journalism professor Jack Colwell said. “Ohio, of course, was the big prize, and early on it looked as though [former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick] Santorum had a real shot at winning,” Colwell said. “If he had won, it could have been a disaster for Romney … because everyone would talk about how he could go on to be the Republican presidential nominee if he’s supposed to be the frontrunner and can’t wrap up the nomination.” Romney ultimately won the tight primary with 38 percent of the popular vote to Santorum’s 37 percent, earning Romney 35 of his leading 429 total Republican delegates, according to CNN.com election results. “[Romney’s win] turned the whole thing around. It only matters whether you win or lose, not the margin, so that made it a pretty good night for him,” Colwell said. “He ended up being a big winner, getting more delegates from a big state. A few thousand votes changed things.” Though Romney’s victory in Ohio earned him a significant number of delegates to cushion his current lead, the win “didn’t clinch anything” due to Santorum’s primary wins in Oklahoma and Tennessee, Colwell said. Santorum gained additional momentum in leading the North Dakota caucuses with 40 percent of the vote, but Colwell said he faces a challenge in catching up to Romney. “[Santorum] picked up some delegates in North Dakota, but one of the problems for him now is that delegates are at stake in all these races,” Colwell said. “As of this afternoon, he had 169 delegates to Romney’s 429, but you need 1,144 delegates to win, so it’s not over yet.” Of the seven Super Tuesday primaries, Romney won in his home state of Massachusetts, Vermont, Ohio and Virginia, according to CNN.com results. Santorum took Oklahoma and Tennessee, and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich captured his home state of Georgia. Colwell said Santorum supporters might interpret Gingrich’s Georgia victory as a lost opportunity. “Santorum’s people are trying to pressure Gingrich to drop out of the race because they think Santorum might have won if Gingrich had not run in Georgia,” he said. “Romney is not popular in the South, and with Mississippi and Alabama [primaries] coming up, Gingrich could win one of those, taking away delegates Santorum would probably have gotten without Gingrich.” Despite Gingrich’s win in Georgia, Colwell said his 118 delegates are not enough to consider him a legitimate candidate. “Gingrich basically has no chance now … He hasn’t had the organization of other candidates,” Colwell said. “He has a big ego, so he might want to stay in and not drop out because of that.” The fourth candidate in the Republican presidential race, Texas congressman Ron Paul, is likely continuing his campaign to make a statement about his platform, Colwell said. “He has yet to win any primary and has very few delegates, so nobody thinks he has a chance for the nomination,” he said. “I think he will stay in the race because he wants to have a platform and express his ideas.” Although the May 8 Indiana presidential primary is nearly two months away, Colwell said its results could have an impact on the race for the Republican nomination. “[The primary] usually means nothing because it’s so late,” he said. “But four years ago, [Hillary] Clinton and [President Barack] Obama had a real battle in Indiana, so with Santorum on the ballot, he and Romney could still be going at it in a battle for the second time in a row.”last_img read more

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Marathon raises money for hospital

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first_imgDancing continues to be more than just fun for many members of the Belles community. The seventh annual Dance Marathon held at Saint Mary’s on Saturday raised over $80,000 for the Riley Hospital for Children, which helps needy families seeking medical care. Rebecca Guerin, president of the Dance Marathon, said she was impressed with this year’s fundraising total. “Last year we raised $63,248, so this year we took on the 20 percent challenge from the foundation, which meant that our goal was to raise $75,898,” Guerin said. “I was speechless when the total was revealed at $80,523.57. It was the best feeling in the world knowing that we exceeded our initial goal and beat last year’s total by 27.3 percent, especially in this economy.” The theme of the 12-hour dance marathon was “Animal Kingdom,” Guerin said. “We definitely got the theme right this year,” she said. “The dancers came dressed in crazy animal attire, and it was really great to see the excitement!” The event featured live animals, including a baby lion and a baby kangaroo. Songs about animals also played in the background, Guerin said. “We had an animal show early in the marathon that included various animals from bunnies to snakes,” she said. “The show was great because everyone could pet the animals after the show.” Guerin said the most exciting part of the night was the exotic animals brought in by a company from Michigan. “The lion cub, baby kangaroo, fennec fox and an exotic bird were among the exotic animals at the event,” she said. “It was so cool being able to interact with the animals, especially the lion cub.” Over 15 Riley families spoke at the event, a record number, according to Guerin. “Many people don’t realize how much of an impact the money we all raise makes a difference for the Riley families,” she said. “Riley Hospital for Children never turns away a child due to their inability to pay for care or lack of insurance.” Guerin said she credits the success of the event to the team who organized the dance. “Having a great group of girls working together towards this goal was amazing,” she said. “I honestly had the best executive board and committee members that anyone could ask for.”last_img read more

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Cuevas receives Outstanding Senior Award

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first_imgSaint Mary’s senior Silvia Cuevas, a business major with concentrations in finance and international business, received the Outstanding Senior Award for her work as a student exemplifying the spirit and values of the College.  According to a College press release, the Alumnae Association Board bestows the award to a senior who worked to embody the “heart of the College” during her four years. Director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said the Outstanding Senior Award is one of three honors bestowed on seniors who personified qualities essentially Saint Mary’s.”As the valedictorian represents the mind and the Lumen Christi Award recipient reflects the soul, the Outstanding Senior Award embodies the heart of Saint Mary’s,” O’Brien said “Silvia’s combination of intelligence, spirit and determination are what make her stand out as she graduates.” Cuevas, a native of Hammond, Ind., has been involved in many different activities on campus throughout her four years at Saint Mary’s, culminating in her term as senior class president this year.   “I found my niche with Student Government, the Intercultural Leadership Progra, and the Spark Program,” Cuevas said. “People are right about Saint Mary’s: small campus, big opportunities.” Class of 2013 vice president Ambreen Ahmad said Cuevas perfectly embodies the mission of the Colleg.. “Silvia really encourages people to strive to do anything they set their hearts to,” Ahmad said.  “She has such a positive spirit and is not afraid of any challenge.” Cuevas said she enjoyed forming relationships with different professors and faculty who have inspired her during her four years at Saint Mary’s.  Mana Derakhshani, assistant director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership and Intercultural Leadership Certificate chair, said Cuevas was a joy to have in the program because she was willing to offer her insights onghow to create a more inclusive community “I have extremely high hopes for Silvia,” Derakhshani said. “With her skills at working with others, organizing projects and her passion for bringing about justice, she will change whatever context she is in for the better.” Jill Vihtelic, professor of business, said she shared that high degree of respect for Cuevas after knowing her as both her professor and academic advisor. “Silvia has an infectious smile that warms the classroom climate and invites others to participate,” Vihtelic said.  “I expect Silvia to do very well in her future, for her the sky is the limit.” Cuevas said after graduation she will join the Target team in Minneapolis as a Business Analyst.  “I would eventually like to become the Mayor of Hammond and get involved with the economic development in Northwest Indiana,” Cuevas said.  “I cannot wait to return to where I’m from with corporate experience under my belt to make my neighborhood a better place for future generations.” Cuevas said she will miss Saint Mary’s, which will remain one of her favorite chapters.in her life. Contact Kelly Konya at kkonya01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

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ACE celebrates 20th anniversary

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first_imgNotre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) will celebrate its 20th anniversary with a cross-country bus tour, kicking off Sept. 30. The tour will make 15 stops on its first leg, according to Fr. Timothy Scully, director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives and one of the bus’ annual riders. It will be at Notre Dame for the Navy football game on Nov. 2 and will make its official stop in South Bend on Nov. 19. Scully said the purpose of the tour is to “celebrate the gift of Catholic education,” both within and outside of Catholic school systems. “We want to recognize the gifts [of] people who have given their life’s energy to [Catholic education] and galvanize support for their efforts,” he said.   With three weeks until the tour kicks off, Scully said ACE is finishing preparations, training bus drivers and confirming tour stops and events. The stops, which range from Indianapolis to Boston and Milwaukee, will each feature a celebration, speaker, awards and a Mass. The tour also will includes meetings and workshops with government and education leaders. In some the events will also include meeting with leaders in government and education. “We have a conference at the [George W.] Bush Institute that the President and Mrs. Bush are hosting in Dallas,” Scully said. “It’s a workshop . . . on parental choice in school and the value of education in the inner cities.” In addition, the Washington, D.C. stop will include meetings with members of Congress involved in education policy, he said.  According to the program’s website, Scully and Fr. Sean McGraw co-founded ACE in 1993 with Service Through Teaching, a cost-free Masters’ in Education program that sends well-qualified teachers into Catholic school systems. The program has graduated more than 1,200 teachers. Since its inception, ACE has expanded its programs and initiatives, which now include additional training programs for Catholic educators, such as the Mary Ann Remick Leadership Program and the English as a New Language certification, the website states. It also provides services such as coach training and professional development workshops; and outreach initiatives that serve minority or at-risk populations. Contact Emily McConville at emcconvl@nd.edulast_img read more

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Students stand with Venezuela

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first_imgOn Monday students gathered in the Dooley Room of LaFortune Student Center to raise awareness about the ongoing Venezuelan protests against President Maduro that have become increasingly violent over the past weeks.Venezuelan university students began protests against the government on Feb. 12, said sophomore and organizer of the event Daniela Nunez.“Feb. 12 was a national youth day, and college students started protesting against the oppressive government [that has been in place] for 15 years,” she said. “Since then, some have been wounded and some have died.”Students were able to take pictures with posters saying “I care Venezuela” and “I am your voice, Venezuela,” as well as with the Venezuelan flag, Nunez said.“We’re going to post these pictures and create a video that can be shared, to show that, even in South Bend, we care,” she said. “There have also been campaigns by Venezuelans in other cities that are using the hashtags ‘SOS Venezuela’ and ‘Pray for Venezuela’ because, even if you can’t do much, you can still pray.”Nunez said students joined with the Notre Dame Peace Fellowship on Friday to say a rosary for Venezuela.“It was student-led and it went well,” she said. “We started standing in front of Stonehenge and processed to the Grotto to finish the last decade [of the rosary].”Nunez said she and other students are motivated to inform Notre Dame students about the crisis because the media censorship in Venezuela makes it more difficult for the protestors’ message to reach outside audiences.“Much of the media in Venezuela is controlled by the state, and most of the information is coming from social media like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram,” she said. “We want to raise awareness and point eyes towards the situation in Venezuela. There’s no respect for human rights by the military and police force.”Nunez said she has family in Venezuela, and feels strongly about supporting Venezuelans.“I grew up with a strong sense of Venezuelan culture,” she said. “I am American, but I am also Venezuelan.”Junior Diana Gutierrez said she attended the event because she believes it is important for students to understand the unrest in Venezuela.“They are doing their best to create a better country, and the student movement has mostly been nonviolent,” she said.Freshman Jessica Pedroza said she believes it is important to show support for students participating in the movement.“As students, we have a social obligation to support students fighting for justice,” she said. “My heart goes out to all who are suffering and all whose voices are being silenced.”Tags: Protests, SOS Venezuela, Venezuelalast_img read more

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Alumnae visit Rwanda and present art gallery

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first_imgTwo Saint Mary’s alumnae, Malea Schulte and Elizabeth Palmer, will share the transformational experiences they had during a research trip in Rwanda at the Moreau gallery opening, “Project Rwanda,” on December 8.While in Rwanda this past year, 2013 graduate Palmer and 2014 graduate Schulte, as part of their project, approached different Rwandans and asked them how they wanted to be remembered, Palmer said.“Face of Christ, change-maker and servant were some of the answers that flowed from their souls,” Palmer said. “We had them write their answer on a white board and took a picture for our exhibit.”“Project Rwanda” will also feature the photography of Jonathan Bell, a passionate photographer from Asia, who will be joining Palmer and Schulte opening night, Palmer said. Prayer flags will be displayed and the artists’ reflections will be depicted.The idea to create the art exhibit came after Schulte’s recent completion of her senior computation titled “Storybank,” which included individual paintings of different members of the Saint Mary’s community.One of Schulte’s interviewees was a woman from Rwanda, whose story inspired Palmer and Schulte to travel to Rwanda in recognition of the 20-year anniversary of the Rwandan genocide. The duo hoped to build connections with people and promote peace through relationships, Palmer said.“Malea interned at a faith based NGO called PICO (People Improving Communities Through Organizing), whose focus is on the different needs of communities, such as clinics and housing, through the world with a base in Rwanda,” Palmer said. “Our connection with PICO paved the way to meeting people and making connections while in Rwanda. The confidence we developed and relationships we formed at Saint Mary’s were our motivating factors.”Shulte’s and Palmer’s goal was to depict the intrinsic beauty of the people of Rwanda 20 years after a horrific genocide, Palmer said.“The photographs are windows to their souls depicting a genuine nature of love, courage, strength, and humility in the midst of suffering, strength and forgiveness 20 years post genocide,” Palmer said. “It parallels the core values of Saint Mary’s College, including faith and spirituality, justice, community and learning. My emotions revolve around gratitude towards the Rwandan’s to open their hearts and share their stories. It is a humbling feeling to get to share their powerful stories with the community here.”“The people of Rwanda are authentic,” Palmer said. “A beauty exists there that allowed us to feel welcomed as their sisters in Christ. There is a simplicity in Rwanda that allowed us to reflect on the meaning of life where relationships are intensely valued. The people in Rwanda have overcome hardship and yet they do not dwell in negativity. Instead, they understand that each day is a gift that should be lived to the fullest.”The Rwandan people opened Palmer’s eyes to what it means to be alive, she said.“We were able to create relationships and have maintained contact,” Palmer said. “We were able to highlight our similarities and acknowledge our differences. This allowed us to gain perspective into humanity.”For both Palmer and Schulte, the beauty of creating Project Rwanda was its unpredictability, Palmer said.“We are not completely sure where it might lead,” Palmer said. “A year ago, Malea and I never could have imagined that we would travel to Rwanda. With faith, support and encouragement from our mentors and peers, and generous support from donors who are Saint Mary’s affiliates, we conquered our goal. It was an empowering experience, and Malea and I will most definitely utilize our teamwork to continue sharing in personal stories of people across the world.”Tags: africa, elizabeth palmer, liz palmer, malea schulte, moreau gallery opening, project rwarnda, Rwanda, storybanklast_img read more

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ND architecture graduate designs venue for papal visit

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first_imgJust weeks before receiving his master’s degree from the Notre Dame School of Architecture earlier this year, James Lenahan learned he had won the Papal Sanctuary Design Contest, a competition held by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to design the sanctuary in which Pope Francis will celebrate Mass during his first visit to the United States later this month.Lenahan’s submission — only recently announced to the public as the winning entry — will inspire the final design of the sanctuary to be constructed in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the closing Mass of the eighth World Meeting of Families on Sept. 27.“It was just an incredible honor to have been selected and a really amazing thing for [me], as a student at the time, to contribute to this incredible, historic event,” Lenahan said.Lenahan said he specifically tailored his design to reflect the mission of the World Meeting of Families, which according to a press release by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is “to strengthen the sacred bonds of family across the globe and highlight its intrinsic value to the good of society.”There were relatively few contest requirements, and the majority of the regulations concerned the physical dimensions of the sanctuary and the inclusion of elements such as an altar, the pope’s chair, a lectern and an ambo. Thus, Lenahan said he had considerable freedom to experiment with ideas for his design.“It was a little bit of a challenge because we had ideas of what was required for the competition, but other than the basic elements, it was kind of open-ended in terms of what they might be looking for,” he said. “In some sense, in design that can be challenging, just in terms of having a completely blank slate.”Receiving little guidance from the competition itself, Lenahan said he turned to previous examples of large Papal Masses — such as Pope John Paul II’s 1979 Mass in Chicago — for inspiration. He said his ultimate goal was to create “something that would be harmonious with what the site was, the shape of the site.”Taking into account a variety of practical considerations – foremost among these the estimated crowd size of 1.5 million – Lenahan said he eventually decided to elevate the sanctuary in order to make it more visible.He also said he settled upon a traditional style for his design, in keeping with the classical façade of the Philadelphia Museum of Art which will provide the backdrop for the Mass.“The classical has a great deal of beauty that can enlighten the sense of the sacred to a Mass even when it’s an outdoor setting,” he said.According to Samantha Salden, assistant dean of the graduate programs in the School of Architecture, Lenahan’s implementation of a classical design was particularly fitting because of the Notre Dame architecture program’s emphasis on classical and traditional architecture.Salden, who also served as Lenahan’s graduate advisor, said Lenahan came to Notre Dame “eager to expand his understanding of classical architecture.”“[He] felt a passion for tradition and for doing good things for communities, whether that be within an institution or a neighborhood or a broader community,” Salden said. “He is a very unassuming person, very quiet, but very talented.”In addition to the prize money associated with the award, Salden said Lenahan will receive countless benefits from winning the contest.“It’s quite prestigious,” she said. “The fact that it is going to have an international audience, not just a national audience, with an event of this scale is hugely gratifying for Jim and will serve him well for years to come.”And beyond its personal impact on Lenahan, Salden said the award is significant because it highlights the ability of architectural design to alter people’s perceptions.“Architecture is a vibrant and important part of our everyday experience,” she said. “What we do is not just about putting up structures that are expressive of ourselves personally, but to be a great architect you have to be able to respond to the community that is using this structure, this building.”Like Salden, Lenahan said he recognized the award to be a formative milestone in his career as an architect.“It was a great opportunity that was offered based on my studies at Notre Dame, and I feel fortunate that I had some of the tools through studying there that allowed me to participate,” Lenahan said.“It is incredibly humbling and I just hope that [my design] will be a successful setting for this event.”Tags: James Lenahan, Pope Francis, Samantha Salden, School of Architecturelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students participate in Belles Beginnings

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first_imgThe Saint Mary’s class of 2020 will participate in the annual Belles Beginnings orientation program this weekend, as the incoming students will engage in bonding opportunities, listen to speeches on campus safety and foster open discussions with peer mentors.Student body president Emma McCarthy said she hopes first-year and transfer students embrace the social aspect of Belles Beginnings and acquaint themselves with classmates.“The single most important part of orientation is that our first-year students feel that they are a part of our campus community,” McCarthy said. “Whether it be through their first introductions with their roommates, getting to know the other women in their residence halls or meeting their peer mentor groups, there will be no shortage of opportunities for the class of 2020 to get to know each other and begin to build community.”According to McCarthy, Belles Beginnings prepares students to take on the challenges of the upcoming academic year in a new environment.“[New students] are about to begin the most amazing journey of their lives, and I hope they know that the Saint Mary’s community is here to help them every step of the way,” McCarthy said. “There will be hard days, but my hope is that the amazing days, the days that remind them why they chose to be a Belle, will far outnumber the hard ones.”McCarthy said Belles Beginnings will help students feel connected to their new home at Saint Mary’s.“My biggest hope for [new students] is that they know how much their fellow Belles love them and how excited we all are that they are here,” McCarthy said. “I hope first-year students learn that they have been given all of the tools that they need to have a successful first year at Saint Mary’s. Now it is their turn to use their gifts and abilities to make their Saint Mary’s experience what they want it to be.”Student body vice president Mary Joy Dingler said orientation weekend will help students grow in appreciation for the Saint Mary’s community.“I hope the new students learn that they can always count on their fellow Belles and that they really will be okay during their first year at Saint Mary’s,” Dingler said. “Saint Mary’s is such an amazing place, and it fosters such an amazing community and sisterhood.”Belles Beginnings will prepare students for the transformative college experience that lies ahead, according to Dingler.“College is a time to explore and discover more about yourself, and I hope when they take that last walk down the Avenue in 2020 that they’ve grown, learned, loved and most importantly, that they are happy with who they’ve become,” Dingler said. “First years and transfers alike should be welcomed by Saint Mary’s and welcome it back with open arms.”McCarthy said incoming students should become involved in clubs, sports or other extracurricular activities to take advantage of all Saint Mary’s has to offer.“If [students] do not want to stay at Saint Mary’s, then they will not fully engage in the campus community, which is a tragedy for both themselves and the College,” McCarthy said. “We want these women to stay with us throughout their college experience, so welcoming them is our utmost priority.”Dingler said students will feel embraced by a supportive community the second they set foot on campus, so Belles Beginnings will merely strengthen their initial impression of the College.“I hope as [students] move in and get to know the campus, they’ll realize that they have made one of the best decisions of their lives,” Dingler said. “Once a Belle, always a Belle.”Tags: Belles Beginnings, Class of 2020, Freshman Orientation 2016, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s to host event to raise awareness about hunger

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first_imgThe Student Diversity Board at Saint Mary’s College will be hosting its annual Hunger Banquet on Wednesday, Nov. 14 in Haggar College Center. The banquet raises awareness about the poverty and hunger that impact people all across the world, specifically by demonstrating how meal sizes vary according to one’s social class.Student Diversity Board president and junior Bella Tillman explained that guests to the dinner will be randomly seated at a table representing a specific social class. Tillman said the low income group will be have the largest number of students to reflect the relative size of this socioeconomic class throughout the world. The meals provided will differ according to the table.“If you are in the low income group then you only get rice and water,” Tillman said. “The middle income group gets rice, water, lentils, and salad. And then if you are in the high income group you get a really nice meal.”Senior and Student Diversity Board marketing chair Leslie Taubert said in an email the banquet is designed to showcase the prevalence of hunger throughout the world. She said organizers hope to expose attendees to the every day reality of many people throughout the world.“The Hunger Banquet really shows how food injustice is a problem around the world,” she said. “Often, people are so used to the bubble they are in that they forget other problems in the world, so it is nice to take the time to think about the injustice and talk about ways to help.”The Hunger Banquet event stems from Oxfam, a “a global organization working to end the injustice of poverty,” according to its website. This global organization encourages colleges to host hunger banquets on campus in order to “respond to global crises, highlight issues of injustice, and change the laws that keep people trapped in poverty,” the website said.Tillman expressed hope the event would raise awareness and encourage students to seriously consider how they can contribute to the fight against global hunger.“I hope students realize that we need to start doing things to combat world hunger,” she said. “I know it’s hard to know what we can do, but I think attending the dinner and educating yourself on how prevalent world hunger is doing something. As students, we are so focused on our school work and on what we are doing in our daily lives that we forget that other people in the world are struggling so much.”Tags: hunger, hunger banquet, Oxfam, saint mary’s, Student Diversity Boardlast_img read more

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Student senate calls on University to revise new housing policies

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first_imgIn a resolution passed Monday evening, the student senate urged University administrators to revise the new Residential Life policies. The new policies, set to take effect in fall of 2021, would ban off-campus students from participating in certain residence hall community events and programs.The senate will hold a special meeting Tuesday to discuss the new changes with Erin Hoffmann Harding — the vice president for Student Affairs — and Heather Rakoczy Russell — the associate vice president for Residential Life.Although administrators had hoped the new policies, announced Apr. 11, would encourage students to stay on campus all four years, the changes sparked major pushback from the student body. Most students welcomed the new incentives for on-campus residents — which include free laundry and flexible meal plans — but many objected to the changes excluding off-campus students from the residence hall communities.Senators argued that upperclassmen who move off campus play a key role in fostering community within the residence halls. “Seniors who move off campus are still very much a part of the residential hall community, so I don’t think it should be considered [their] ‘former’ residence halls,” Fisher Hall senator and sophomore DC Morris said. “These guys and gals come back to Mass, they participate in dorm fundraisers and all that stuff — it’s not their ‘former’ residence hall.”Specifically, student government leaders expressed fear that the changes would harm vulnerable student populations. Co-director of Student Life and junior Abby Smith underscored the financial pressures that lead many low-income students to move off campus.“You basically pay 9% more to live on campus than you would to live off campus,” Smith said.The resolution highlighted the experiences of LGBTQ students, victims of sexual assault and dating violence, disabled students and racial and ethnic minorities. Many of these students have experienced adverse treatment within their residence halls, as revealed by the 2018 Inclusive Campus Survey and the 2018 Sexual Conduct and Climate Questionnaire. The new policies may further alienate students who move off campus to avoid this adverse treatment, senators argued.“Separating [these students] from the activities that do build community cohesiveness and friendships … may eliminate the few remaining positive elements of a social living space for them,” the resolution said.The objections raised Monday evening reflect a larger, ongoing debate about inclusivity and diversity on campus. In the wake of the Inclusive Campus Survey, which exposed the negative experiences many minority and female students face, student government leaders have been critical of the University administration. In the 2019-2020 session of the student senate, student government leaders plan to carry this debate forward. Duncan Hall senator and freshman Jackson Oxler said he saw the resolution as an important step in the fight for student well-being. “I think it’s really important that as the representative body as the student population here at Notre Dame, we take steps in the right direction toward representing student opinions — especially when issues that are this important to the students … come into play,” Oxler said in a comment after the meeting.Monday marked the last regular senate meeting of the spring semester. After Tuesday’s special meeting with Hoffmann Harding and Russell, the senate concluded until next fall.Despite the approaching end of the spring semester, however, senators continued planning for their work ahead. They discussed creating senate committees focusing on residential life, University finance and academic affairs.“I think [residential life] is going to be a really important issue going forward, especially next year,” Alumni Hall senator and freshman Jack Rotolo said. “I’m 99% positive there will be more work to do after [the special senate meeting Tuesday], so I think it will be really important — especially for our constituents — that we have a senate committee pursuing this.”Tags: 2019-2020 senate, inclusive campus survey, residential life changes, student senatelast_img read more

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