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Dean announces new postdoctoral fellows

By on March 1, 2021

first_img Read Full Story Harvard Graduate School of Education Dean James Ryan announced today three postdoctoral fellows — Diamond Bravo, Mariam Durrani, and Jarvis Givens — as part of the newly developed Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellowship for Faculty Development. The fellowship, supported in part by the President’s Office, prepares outstanding recent doctoral graduates from diverse backgrounds for successful faculty careers in the education. They will join HGSE this July for the two-year fellowship.“I am thrilled to welcome Diamond, Mariam, and Jarvis to the HGSE community. Their backgrounds are incredibly impressive, as is their current work. Each has conducted essential research on how educators can better serve diverse populations,” Ryan said. “Just as I know our students and faculty will benefit from their scholarship and teaching, I am sure that each of these fellows will also have a powerful impact on the broader field of education, and I am delighted that HGSE will play a role in preparing them to do just that.”last_img read more

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Cuevas receives Outstanding Senior Award

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgSaint Mary’s senior Silvia Cuevas, a business major with concentrations in finance and international business, received the Outstanding Senior Award for her work as a student exemplifying the spirit and values of the College.  According to a College press release, the Alumnae Association Board bestows the award to a senior who worked to embody the “heart of the College” during her four years. Director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said the Outstanding Senior Award is one of three honors bestowed on seniors who personified qualities essentially Saint Mary’s.”As the valedictorian represents the mind and the Lumen Christi Award recipient reflects the soul, the Outstanding Senior Award embodies the heart of Saint Mary’s,” O’Brien said “Silvia’s combination of intelligence, spirit and determination are what make her stand out as she graduates.” Cuevas, a native of Hammond, Ind., has been involved in many different activities on campus throughout her four years at Saint Mary’s, culminating in her term as senior class president this year.   “I found my niche with Student Government, the Intercultural Leadership Progra, and the Spark Program,” Cuevas said. “People are right about Saint Mary’s: small campus, big opportunities.” Class of 2013 vice president Ambreen Ahmad said Cuevas perfectly embodies the mission of the Colleg.. “Silvia really encourages people to strive to do anything they set their hearts to,” Ahmad said.  “She has such a positive spirit and is not afraid of any challenge.” Cuevas said she enjoyed forming relationships with different professors and faculty who have inspired her during her four years at Saint Mary’s.  Mana Derakhshani, assistant director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership and Intercultural Leadership Certificate chair, said Cuevas was a joy to have in the program because she was willing to offer her insights onghow to create a more inclusive community “I have extremely high hopes for Silvia,” Derakhshani said. “With her skills at working with others, organizing projects and her passion for bringing about justice, she will change whatever context she is in for the better.” Jill Vihtelic, professor of business, said she shared that high degree of respect for Cuevas after knowing her as both her professor and academic advisor. “Silvia has an infectious smile that warms the classroom climate and invites others to participate,” Vihtelic said.  “I expect Silvia to do very well in her future, for her the sky is the limit.” Cuevas said after graduation she will join the Target team in Minneapolis as a Business Analyst.  “I would eventually like to become the Mayor of Hammond and get involved with the economic development in Northwest Indiana,” Cuevas said.  “I cannot wait to return to where I’m from with corporate experience under my belt to make my neighborhood a better place for future generations.” Cuevas said she will miss Saint Mary’s, which will remain one of her favorite chapters.in her life. Contact Kelly Konya at kkonya01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

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SMC students studying in Rome to return to the U.S., remain off campus for 14 days

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first_imgSaint Mary’s students studying abroad at John Cabot University in Rome for the spring semester will be sent home, vice president for student affairs Linda Timm announced early Saturday morning in a campus-wide email.The announcement follows a report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the State Department, escalating the advisory against non-essential travel for Italy to a Warning Level 3 as coronavirus continues to spread throughout the country.This statement was made just hours after Notre Dame announced the suspension of the University’s Rome program, and ordered the return of the 106 students studying there.“With the safety of our students as our highest priority, this has prompted Saint Mary’s officials to make the difficult but necessary decision to bring all students from Rome for the remainder of the semester,” Timm said in the email.The students were notified of these changes on Friday evening, Timm said in the email.Upon returning to the U.S., the students will complete their academic semester from home, via “remote learning established by John Cabot University,” and will not return to campus.“Out of an abundance of caution, and consistent with protocols established by the CDC, those returning are required to stay home for 14 days and receive a physician’s clearance prior to campus visit,” Timm said.The College is monitoring the status of all countries, and Timm said officials are prepared to take “additional and immediate action,” as needed.“Our students from the Rome Program will be disappointed by this news,” she said. “Please keep them in your prayers and be supportive of them during this time of transition.”This is an ongoing report.Tags: CDC, coronavirus, John Cabot University, Linda Timm, Rome, study abroadlast_img read more

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Motherstruck, Directed by Cynthia Nixon, Canceled Off-Broadway

By on January 18, 2021

first_imgDrama and the city. The world premiere of MotherStruck!, written and performed by Staceyann Chin and directed by Cynthia Nixon, will no longer begin previews on September 24 at Culture Project’s Lynn Redgrave Theater. The project has been postponed indefinitely.“At this point…we do not have the resources to produce MotherStruck! in the manner in which it deserves,” said Allan Buchman, Artistic Director of Culture Project, in a statement.MotherStruck! sets forth Chin’s personal journey to motherhood as a single woman, lesbian and activist who does not have health insurance or a “serious, stable financial set up,” but wants to have a child. Told through Chin’s uniquely personal and poetic lens, this solo show explores how the process changed her life and how she makes peace with what she learns from this profound experience.     View Commentslast_img read more

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Watch the Silliest ALW Mash-Up in History

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first_img Related Shows View Comments Andrew Lloyd Webber currently has three shows running on Broadway and on December 22, the casts of School of Rock, Cats and Phantom took over GMA for a mash-up that brightened up our mornings. Broadcasting live from Rock’s home, the Winter Garden, giggle below as Dewey Finn makes Grizabella a groupie and pushes the Phantom past the point of no return. Oh, and the Rum Tum Tugger’s reaction to “Masquerade”…is, well, curious? There’s also an interview with Lloyd Webber direct from the Phantom’s lair at Her Majesty’s Theatre in London (“right now I’m an unemployed composer looking for a new subject”). Probably best they did this before Norma Desmond’s return to Broadway come February; she tends to hog the spotlight and we’re sure Tugger would have had something to meow about it. ABC Breaking News | Latest News VideosABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos Lloyd Webber Shows on ‘GMA’ Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 20, 2019 School of Rock – The Musicallast_img read more

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Reflections on the Venezuelan Crisis

By on December 20, 2020

first_imgBy Brazilian Army Colonel (R) Fernando Montenegro* July 12, 2019 The European Union and the Lima Group currently oversee negotiations in Venezuela between dictator Nicolás Maduro and Interim President Juan Guaidó. The Venezuelan economic catastrophe worsens due to debt with China and Russia.The Russian position can be clearly identified as that of a disruptive actor, with no regard for Venezuelans’ miserable conditions, in an area that has historically been favorable to the United States.While the United States, the European Union, and the 14 nations that are part of the Lima Group recognize Guaidó’s legitimacy and the severity of the humanitarian crisis that has led Brazil and Colombia to accept millions of refugees, Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov reaffirms support for an illegitimate regime in Caracas, which systematically conducts corrupt activities, drug trafficking, and transnational organized crimes, in operations involving Maduro’s relatives, his generals, and front men. Operation LibertyU.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo recently tried to find common ground with Lavrov to no avail at the Artic Council on May 6, even after Russia expressed concern about the April 30 event. At that time, Guaidó led a group of Venezuelans in an attempt to establish constitutional order and restore democracy and human rights, in what became known as Operation Liberty. However, Guaidó’s wishes, along with millions of Venezuelans, could only be made possible with a mutiny, because Hugo Chávez had disarmed the population just over a decade ago. One of the positive outcomes of the protest was the release of Leopoldo López, the leader of Guaidó’s political party (Voluntad Popular), who was under house arrest.Despite the wish of millions of Venezuelans for a stronger participation from Brazil in helping with the Venezuelan crisis, including sending troops to the neighboring country, the Brazilian foreign policy has a long-standing non-interventionist tradition — a position President Jair Bolsonaro recently ratified. As a new development, as if in response to Moscow, the day after Russia confirmed its support for the dictator Maduro, during the Arctic Council, Venezuela returned to the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance, approved by the General Assembly. This treaty enables the request for assistance from foreign troops of signatory countries such as Peru, Colombia, and even the United States, to solve internal conflicts. Since Guaidó is the recognized president, this is a tangible possibility.Dying governmentCurrently, Maduro is nothing but a declining ruler, artificially maintaining power, akin to a terminal patient in an intensive care unit. Various methods are used to keep the puppet in power, and those are literally paid for in gold. Recently, a large-capacity Russian aircraft landed in Caracas and transported 20 tons of precious metal, equivalent to about 20 percent of Venezuelan’s reserves, to an undisclosed location.Maduro’s growing loss of trust for his armed forces and state structures is increasingly evident upon verification that the dictator’s security and that of the country’s critical infrastructures are managed by Private Military Contractors (PMCs), such as Wagner Group and Cossacks, led by former Russian service members who are very close to the Kremlin, consisting of some form of indirect military operation from Vladimir Putin. In addition it is widely known that Cuban agents carry out private security.Furthermore, a Russian task force arrived in the country to maintain and fix all Russian military equipment, such as aircraft, armored vehicles, and anti-aircraft defense systems. Because Venezuelan service members were not trained to work with such sophisticated equipment, PMCs also brought pilots to operate the Russian manufactured Sukhoi aircraft, and other Russian defense systems. The Kremlin’s concern is well founded, since the poor performance of some Russian military equipment in a possible mission could cause great damage to the country’s lucrative and traditional military equipment industry.As far as we know, Venezuela has anywhere between 1,000 and 2,000 generals who, along with their family members, occupy key roles in the government and state-owned companies. However, this is a forged “loyalty,” since it was bought during the Chávez era and is currently maintained through blackmail. Nonetheless, we must emphasize that the Cuban intelligence service controls the details of these high-ranking officers’ lives to ensure their loyalty to the government.The question remains as to how the game will unfold following a possible change of position from the Havana government.* Colonel Montenegro is the Brazilian Army’s Special Forces operator and researcher for the Autonomous University of Lisbon, International Relations Observatory.last_img read more

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How to be more respected at work

By on December 17, 2020

first_imgBeing respected feels great. Here are four easy ways you can gain respect from your colleagues.Don’t be a weakling: Nobody likes a jerk in the office. On the other hand, if you’re too nice, you can come across as a pushover. Find a balance somewhere on the nicer side of the middle.Own up to mistakes: You won’t have many fans if you think you’re right all the time. Even if that’s often the case, you’re not perfect. You’ll impress your coworkers if you can be humble enough to admit your mistakes.Help out: Everybody is busy. Anytime you can help someone lighten their load, it will definitely be appreciated. If you are someone others can depend on, you’ll definitely earn respect.Dish it out: An easy way to be respected by your coworkers, is to give it in return. It’s often easy to respect someone who has been respectful to you. 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Communities, cryptocurrency, blockchain, and core relevance

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first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jon Ungerland Jon Ungerland believes the core philosophy underlying credit unions is the plausible and sustainable model for preserving healthy financial institutions and promoting financially dignified and strong communities in the 21st … Web: www.dalandsolutions.com Details It was election night, 2016.  The evening hours were long gone, and most news network anchors appeared as if they were staring into an inevitable and unanticipated cloud of chaos.  The results were rolling in, and it seemed increasingly likely Donald Trump would be the 45th President of these United States. Like most Americans, I was clinging to a glass (or a few) of my favorite spirit (bourbon) to take the edge off the national anxiety (or anticipation) which had come to an impressive boiling point in recent weeks and finally culminated in the late hours of November 8th, 2016.  Bourbon in one hand, smartphone in the other, I did the best thing my analytical mind could reason to do in those exciting hours: I bought a bunch of Bitcoin (and other cryptocurrencies). The next morning, I had to explain to my wife what I had done in my spirited moment of inspiration and intuition (damned real-time transaction alerts!).  My answer: I bet on distrust; I gambled on disruption; I wagered on American anxiety.  The bet paid off. The rest is history (at least the first chapter of a new history, anyhow).  In the following year, Bitcoin (and most other cryptos) exploded. At its height, in December 2017, Bitcoin (the gold-standard of the crypto coins) had increased over 2800% (no, that’s not a typo).  Even at the time of writing this piece, my election night gamble is still paying out at about 1000% (despite the fact cryptos are being pronounced dead and irrelevant on a daily basis!).  Not even this Trumped-up Wall Street that is fueled by unprecedented amounts of near-free money can touch that.So, what inside info did I have, and what does this have to do with credit unions?I had zero inside info.  I had only bourbon, and an acute appreciation for human nature (complimented by a career in community financial institutions and an insatiable philosophical curiosity).  Oh, I also had a foundational understanding of the core technical and philosophical premise of blockchain (the technology undergirding Bitcoin). I knew that Bitcoin and blockchain need one thing to thrive: distrust.  The relevance factor surrounding Bitcoin and blockchain is their ability to enable and support transactions and exchange of value between distrusted and anonymous parties.  Blockchain and the cryptocurrencies they support are relevant to modern, digitally-minded consumers because they make the convenience of digital transactions possible without financial institution or government currency issuer interference.This is where credit unions enter this story.  As we all (hopefully!) know, credit unions are historical epicenters of community trust; they occupy a privileged position as entrusted guardians of centralized storage and transacting of community wealth and assets (or, at least we’re supposed to).  It’s precisely this historical position as centralized stewards which brings into question the relevance of today’s credit unions in the face of technological innovations aimed at democratizing (decentralizing) financial transactions and currency storage/conveyance.  Is your credit union strengthening and preparing its core technology assets in anticipation of this looming relevance crisis?  Or, are you simply continuing to bolt on disjointed platforms (perhaps even attempting to bolt-on blockchain technology!) to dated host environments and fragmented operational data sets?  Can your credit union deliver spendable digital currency directly to your member’s phone, or empower your local businesses to engage with your members a more modern, secure fashion, mobile/digital fashion?  Could your credit union stand up a digital channel to allow members to apply for loans, obtain digital loan dollars on their phone, and spend those dollars with local merchants? If you’re not investing in the right core technology and shifting your thinking around how to use that core technology, then the answer is likely “No.”Much like election night, 2016, I remain an analytical and intuitive wager-oriented technologist.   Looking ahead, I’d place another bet on disruption and distrust. Millennials continue to struggle to accrue capital (savings) and are increasingly saturated with historically unprecedented amounts of debt, while putting off (or foregoing altogether) critical life events which tend to fuel economic growth and stability (buying homes, having children, starting businesses, etc.).  Meanwhile, boomers are facing their own daunting retirement and economic hurdles.  Political unrest looms as midterm elections approach and the prefabricated walls of investigation and legal proceedings close in on our 45th President.  The list goes on … Though I don’t have a bourbon in hand as I write this, I’m inclined to ponder what might be the successful mid-disruption “Bitcoin gamble” for credit unions in coming years.  What investment could credit unions make amidst disruption to net notable gains? I’d put my money on relevant core (“host”) processing; not on the shiny distractions of the day (if only because a truly modern and relevant core will ultimately always be able to process transactions and store value more efficiently, securely, and cost effectively than dispersed blockchain databases).  I’d also bet on credit unions needing to consolidate vendors/platforms and offer more modern digital services delivered as true extensions of their core operations as a means of realizing operational and economic efficiency (rather than perpetuating tired models of shabby bolt-ons creating broken, incomplete data sets in an era driven by intelligent and efficient use of centralized data).  I’m no longer buying Bitcoin under the influence of bourbon; but, I am working with the DaLand CUSO team to create solutions to tokenize core transactions for modern, secure, internet transaction experiences, while crafting creative ways to extend the capabilities of relevant cores beyond the teller line.Meanwhile, many financial institutions (credit unions included) have demonstrated a devoted fascination with the (alleged) cure-all potential of blockchain technology. I’m motivated by this peculiar fascination of the moment; specifically, the fact credit unions and other centralized financial institutions remain fixated on funding and exploring ways to further the development of a technology designed to displace centralized storage of value or borrowing of funds from a trusted party. I’m disappointed by the manic myopia around displacing ourselves from the privileged position as trusted transactors. I’m concerned by these precarious ‘solutions’ being peddled by so-called technologists, supposed consultants, and  industry ‘innovators,’ aggressively and eagerly working to transform credit unions into something altogether incompatible with their origins as institutions chartered on the premise of shared interest and common community economic concerns.The widespread adoption of blockchain technology unequivocally means the transformation of our technological and financial world into one where distrust, anonymity, and decentralized/dispersed authorities dictate the transactional and banking norms to come.  Imagine a world where distrust and decentralized/dispersed data is the basic building block for all financial products and services. Sound like a world where your credit union will thrive?In the spirit of avoiding confusion, and in an attempt to avoid angering the numerous blockchain trolls collecting (handsome) fees to allow credit unions and financial institutions to cross the bridge into the promised future utopias, I want to state the following: blockchain most certainly has a purpose and has valid applications and uses.Alternative, non-governmentally issued or regulated currencies are the prime example.  Another great use case is international payments and funds transfer (outside the current, costly, slow bank-based system).  A third authentic innovation would be a true digital cash, tradeable and transactable without centralized authorities or agencies controlling (or even having knowledge of) every transaction.Credit unions will almost certainly spend many more years and untold additional millions of dollars attempting to unlock the panacea of alternative payments and internet transaction protocols.  I don’t disagree with the pursuit of this goal. Most of our technology within credit unions is terribly, woefully outdated and irrelevant in comparison to industries outside our privileged and protected niche.  This is precisely why we should contemplate the precarious nature of playing with technologies genetically and historically incompatible with the niche we occupy; especially because this niche brings unparalleled value and purpose to so many communities, families, businesses, and individual lives across our nation and the world.Blockchain, Bitcoin, and bank-backed alt-chains and cryptocurrencies aren’t going anywhere (Mr. Robot is probably unnervingly close to the mark on this front).  Panic and distrust will only increase the market cap of these players, again.  Credit unions could very easily be carried away by another wave of economic uncertainty and imposed government regulations and ‘efficiencies.’ Blockchain doesn’t increase the amount of data you have readily available to efficiently mine, analyze, and use in a centralized location to improve your members’ lives and cement your position as the hub of a local economy.  It doesn’t add to the density of your data as a modern financial institution concerned with delivering fast and affordable products and services over various digital channels. It doesn’t reduce transaction costs.  It won’t solve for data-hungry regulations and mandates like CECL. It doesn’t promote centralization and protection of your members’ data; nor is it compatible with mandates to know your member or maintain a centralized, complete, composite understanding of individuals transacting with or borrowing from your institution.  Finally, we haven’t even broached the topic of whether your local or federal regulator will comprehend or condone early escapades and investments into technologies of distrust and decentralization/dispersal of transactions and member data (once they figure out that’s what blockchain fundamentally is and does). This final observation is critical, especially considering eventual academic analyses of Bitcoin’s meteoric rise will likely unveil widespread market manipulations and flaws in the foundational technology (blockchain) made massive ‘pump and dump’ price jumps possible and exploitable.Despite all the present challenges and shortcomings of blockchain technology and the cryptocurrencies it supports, DaLand CUSO believes blockchain, Bitcoin, and other variations of these emerging technologies will be part of your future world.  However, that’s not a question which troubles the exceptional minds on our team. The only question of concern is whether your local universe will be held together by a strong enough core to remain relevant in the face of (or even use to your benefit!) the effects of these emerging forces.  The answer to that question is something I and the DaLand CUSO team are already addressing as a means of ensuring strong credit unions remain real financial gravitational forces and epicenters of community commerce and trust.last_img read more

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Pandemic will distract voters from issues of race, religion in regional elections: Tito

By on October 19, 2020

first_imgHe added that contrary to concerns raised by election watchdogs that holding the regional races this year would unfairly advantage incumbents, incumbents would actually be facing an uphill battle, as they had to showcase their success in flattening the COVID-19 curve in their respective region to potential constituents.“If the curve keeps rising, if there are more victims or more fatalities, I think the public will not vote for them,” he said.Tito said that the regional elections should be used as a platform for ideas about the most effective ways to mitigate the outbreak, as that could help accelerate recovery efforts.“Let the candidates compete with each other on their ideas. The incumbents, therefore, should act more, as they have power and resources,” said Tito.Nine provinces, 224 regencies and 37 municipalities are set to hold regional elections on Dec. 9.The elections had initially been scheduled for Sept. 23 but have been postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak in the country. (asp)Topics : Home Minister Tito Karnavian has said that holding the upcoming simultaneous regional elections amid the COVID-19 pandemic could actually be beneficial, even as experts and observers call for the polls to be postponed.Tito argued that the public’s attention would shift to the COVID-19 outbreak and the regional administrations’ response rather than the issues that typically emerged during elections.”For instance, issues of race, religion and ethnicity would be reduced, as the public is more concerned about the COVID-19 pandemic than these issues,” he said on Wednesday as quoted by a statement on the Home Ministry’s website.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Discusses Education Funding, Budget Priorities on “Schools That Teach” Tour Stop in Allentown

By on October 17, 2020

first_img Press Release,  Schools That Teach Allentown, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today continued the “Schools That Teach” Tour in the Parkland School District, where he stood with district administrators and teachers to speak about the importance of including significant increases in state education funding in the 2015-16 budget.Last week, Governor Wolf vetoed the Republican budget that failed to address the core issues facing Pennsylvania, including a structural budget deficit, a drastically underfunded school system, and rising property taxes for seniors and middle-class families. Governor Wolf has remained committed to passing a 2015-16 budget that contains fair and adequate education funding in part by implementing a commonsense severance tax, provides property tax relief to Pennsylvania families and seniors, fixes the structural deficit, and provides a sound plan to create jobs across this commonwealth.“The people of Pennsylvania want funding for education, and they support a commonsense severance tax to pay for it,” Governor Wolf said. “While my budget proposes a historic $1 billion investment in education at all levels, including $500 million for K-12 education, the Republican budget continues the handouts for oil and gas companies and the underfunding of our schools. Their budget includes only $8 million for education — that’s less than 3 cents, per child, per day.”At Cetronia Elementary School today, Governor Wolf joined Superintendent Rich Sniscak and Principal Jamie Giaquito to discuss the effects that this school district would see from Governor Wolf’s budget. Governor Wolf’s plan includes over half a million dollars in additional funding that would be seen directly in the classrooms of the Parkland School District. That’s over $210,000 more than the amount proposed for the district in the Republican budget.“Governor Wolf’s commitment to fully and fairly allocating state education funding hits home with us in Parkland,” Superintendent Rich Sniscak said. “We could use this additional half a million dollars to implement new and innovative learning options, as well as job training programs to prepare students for entering the higher education institute or workforce of their choice.”Governor Wolf will continue to work with legislators in Harrisburg to enact a 2015-16 budget that not only provides fair and adequate funding for Pennsylvania’s schools, but also provides significant property tax relief and closes the structural budget deficit.MEDIA CONTACT: Jeff Sheridan – 717.783.1116# # # SHARE Email Facebook Twitter July 10, 2015center_img Governor Wolf Discusses Education Funding, Budget Priorities on “Schools That Teach” Tour Stop in Allentownlast_img read more

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