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IU Researcher: Few Benefits For Workers With Temporary Visas

By on September 24, 2020

first_imgNew University of Indiana research has found that most temporary workers from Mexico who get work visas are no better off than those who are undocumented. (Image; Bread for the World/Flickr.)INDIANAPOLIS – Immigrants from Mexico can fill the gap where there’s a need for agricultural or low-skilled work in Indiana and other states. However, a new study finds little benefit for those who legally obtain a temporary worker visa.Indiana University researcher Lauren Apgar found that temporary workers hold jobs with the lowest occupational standing, and with wages equivalent to those of undocumented workers. Their visa requires that they work for the sponsoring employer, which she said prevents advancement.“Overall, this is really suggesting that temporary workers experience some of the poorest employment outcomes, mainly because they cannot experience job mobility,” she said, “and then, they are limited in their wages.”Apgar said one solution would be to reform the temporary workers’ program so that visas are issued directly to workers instead of employers. She said this would make the program more attractive to currently undocumented immigrants.Apgar said changing the visa stipulations also could increase protections for temporary workers.“By not being tied to their employer,” she said, “workers would not fear losing their visa if they needed to report labor abuses or violations – in terms of being paid a lower wage, for example.”The research found that most temporary work permits issued to Mexican nationals are “H-2” visas, for agricultural or non-agricultural, low-skilled work. Apgar said that while her research found changes are needed, the temporary-worker program is still important given the historical migration to the United States from Mexico.“It is fulfilling a need, both in terms of jobs here in the U.S. that need to be filled and for Mexicans that need work,” she said. “However, without these protections in place, it really worsens labor market conditions for all workers in these types of jobs.”According to the research, more than 100,000 additional H-2 visas were offered to workers from Mexico in 2013 than in 1987.More information on Apgar’s research is online at news.indiana.edu.Mary Kuhlmanlast_img read more

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Setien: I’m not afraid of Barcelona job

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first_img Loading… Promoted Content6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone7 Universities In The World With The Highest Market Value7 Breathtaking Train Stations Around The GlobePortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D Graffiti11 Items You’ve Been Using Wrong Your Whole Life15 Action Heroes 25 Years Ago And NowWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The World’s 7 Most Spectacular Railway Stations read also:Real Betis seek return of Barcelona boss Quique Setien “I focus on what I have to focus on, which in this case is Sunday’s game. This is the circus we’re involved in and we accept it, but I don’t waste time listening or reading (speculation).” Setien added: “I know there is noise being made but I have to focus on my own job. It’s not the first time and it won’t be results that there are doubts about a coach when results don’t accompany them.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Barcelona coach, Quique Setien, has said he doesn’t fear for his job. Barcelona boss Setien questions La Liga use of VAR Setien is under pressure with Barca trailing LaLiga leaders Real Madrid by four points. “I don’t spend a minute thinking about that,” he said in a press conference on Saturday.Advertisementlast_img read more

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A cold endeavor: Matt Weber completes daring Frenchman Bay swim

By on September 20, 2020

first_img Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com. Biocenter_img Latest Posts Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 HANCOCK — Matt Weber crouches down as he clings to the rails of a narrow, rain-soaked bridge leading to the Hancock Point wharf on Frenchman Bay. It’s an early Thursday morning, and Weber’s sights are set on the only boat tied to the dock.The bridge is slanted at an angle that makes walking difficult without hunching over, but Weber traverses it easily. After making his way down to the end of the dock, he approaches the boat and takes his sweatshirt and breakaway pants off to reveal a wetsuit underneath. It’s time for a swim.“I can’t believe you’re doing this,” Steve Weber, Matt’s father, says as he looks around. There’s not a patch of blue to be found in the sky overlooking the bay, and the rain is still coming down.Even on nicer days, there aren’t many other swimmers who take to the waters in Frenchman Bay. Even in the peak of summer, the water temperature here rarely, if ever, rises above 60 degrees. On this day, that temperature is a bone-chilling 55.6.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textNone of that is enough to stop Matt. For almost six months now, the Hancock native has been planning this 3-mile swim around Frenchman Bay’s Bean Island to raise awareness for the Frenchman Bay Conservancy. He knew the cold weather would be a problem right from the start, and that prospect isn’t going to faze him now.“This place has truly meant a lot to me throughout my life,” he says. “There’s so much here that’s worth preserving, and I want to show that I’ll do whatever it takes to do that — even if it means swimming in this water.”Weber was a swimmer in high school in Upstate New York and also swam at the Division I level for the University of Buffalo. On vacation from his job as an economic developer in Afghanistan, he figured the summer months would be the only time of year such a swim would be remotely bearable.Those conditions are the reason no one has made the swim around Bean Island before. Even without taking the frigid temperature into consideration, a swim of 3 nautical miles isn’t an easy one. That’s especially true in Frenchman Bay, where changing tides and marine life — Matt later called himself fortunate to have avoided seals, porpoises and jellyfish — can hinder waterway travel.“To do it right, we’ve had to do some planning and hope to have the right amount of luck,” he says. “At the same time, I’m a strong swimmer, and my family is by my side. Plus, it’s for a good cause. Just because no one’s done it before doesn’t mean it’s not worthwhile.”To visualize what he plans to accomplish, Matt divides his swim into three parts: to the island, around the island and back from the island. Depending on the tide strength, he predicts the swim will take him anywhere between an hour and a half and two hours.At about 8:30 a.m., he gets in the water to warm up — or cool down, perhaps, given the water temperature. The wetsuit gives him a little bit of protection, but his visceral reaction to his body hitting the water for the first time is still telling as to how difficult this is going to be.He begins his swim at 8:46 with the 20-foot boat Steve rented from the harbor in Sorrento for safety reasons by his side. From the shoreline to the middle of the bay, there are lobster pots everywhere. To stay on course, he and the boat must navigate through each one of them.Looking out at Frenchman Bay from the stern of the beat, one can see why Matt wants to complete this swim. Even with gray skies, the images of Mount Desert Island, Sorrento Harbor and the bridge linking Hancock and Sullivan bring the bay’s trees, water and miles of shoreline into full view.Throughout his swim, Steve knows Matt is ahead of his pace. He reaches the halfway point at the 28-minute mark, well ahead of the two-hour time for which he’d been aiming before he began his journey.Matt Weber takes a drink of water after completing a 3-mile swim around Bean Island on July 27 in Hancock. Weber, an economic developer who now lives in Afghanistan, made the swim to raise awareness for the Frenchman Bay Conservancy. ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY MIKE MANDELLDespite the temperatures and the exhaustion that come with his nonstop swimming, Matt stops only twice for no more than 10 seconds. Both times, his girlfriend, Kathleen Keiser, offers him protein bars and water. Without hesitating, he declines.At 9:49, Matt reaches the dock to applause from his friends on the boat. At one hour, three minutes, his time is almost a full hour less than what he expected.After pulling back the cap on his wetsuit, he pulls himself onto the dock. After taking a moment to catch his breath, he looks around him at what seems like an endless body of water. It’s an emotional moment, one that reconciles nature’s awe-inspiring magnificence with the humankind’s strength and perseverance.“This bay is part of all of us,” he says. “I’ve realized I need to do more to appreciate it and encourage younger generations to explore and attempt new challenges.”One family member, he says, told him the swim couldn’t be done because of the current. As he shivers in the cold as Keiser hands him a blanket, Matt says that talk has finally been put to rest.“I think I proved a lot to myself and to everybody,” he says. “If one person can look at this and say, ‘Wow,’ I think it will all have been worth it.”last_img read more

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Healthy in-out combo

By on September 17, 2020

first_imgAs a multi-event participant competing in the heptathlon, pentathlon and decathlon, Brennan Boettcher can do is hope to stay healthy has taken some bumps and bruises this season. While talent certainly played a part in the UW men’s track and field team’s indoor national title, Boettcher also believes staying healthy did, too.”Everyone basically did what they could do to win,” Boettcher said. “I’ve stayed relatively healthy this year, our team as whole has stayed really healthy this year; we’ve had a lot of issues in the past with injuries and haven’t had it this year, staying healthy has been big part to our success this year.”While Wisconsin now switches gears to the outdoor season, there isn’t much time for rest as the outdoor season starts up this upcoming weekend.However, Boettcher — the younger brother of former track and field letter-winner Brent Boettcher — believes the team doesn’t necessarily need any time off.”Usually we don’t try to take a lot of time off to let our bodies heal up, unless it’s a bigger meet like the Big Ten [tournament], or a meet where we’re trying to get a lot of qualifying marks for Nationals,” Boettcher said. “This week we’re not taking any time off, we’re training right through it.”Nevertheless, the transition from indoor to outdoor competition may be a little more difficult this season than in years past, as much of Wisconsin’s focus has been on taking the indoor titles and other events are added for the outdoor season.”The first couple weeks of training are definitely a little more [difficult]; we start doing a bit more speed and distance,” Boettcher said. “It’s a little bit difficult, but if you’ve done it once, it’s not so bad.”Staying healthy for a multi-event athlete is a little different than other track athletes in a single competition. Boettcher and other heptathlon, decathlon and pentathlon participants need to make sure they are able to keep up their intensity for not just a few minutes, but hours to maintain a high level of competitiveness over the course of several events.”You can’t compete in a multi-event if you’re not feeling healthy,” Boettcher said. “You need high intensity for three, four hours straight.”But while Boettcher has found his niche as a multi-event athlete for the Badgers, he says his heart is still with the high jump as that is where most of his skills lie. Still, he is committed to the multi-events, but there just isn’t enough time in a day to get all the training he would like to do.”The hardest part about training for multiple events is that there are only seven days in a week and there are 10 events to train for, so you’re constantly doing two or three events a day, as well as running, and then you have to add in strength training, so it can become pretty difficult,” Boettcher said. “You’re looking at a lot of time spent on multiple events, so it’s tough.”Unlike most track and field athletes, Boettcher says he doesn’t have many superstitions. Yet he does have one lucky charm.”We have a lot of different competition uniforms,” Boettcher said. “If I do well in one of them at a certain event, I’ll try and wear it the next time and do the same.”While it may not be the most sanitary thing, the Badgers are hoping Boettcher will be wearing the same jersey all year long as Wisconsin attempts to carry its success from the indoor season outdoors.last_img read more

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Year in Sports : Locked out: NFL lockout leaves uncertain future for SU’s undrafted

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first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Year in Sports: Part 8 of 8Doug Marrone became used to the process. For Marrone, now Syracuse’s head coach, it became natural year after year in his six seasons in the National Football League. For all the uncertainty the NFL Draft brings, the only constant is the process.After seven rounds of teams’ picks, the rest of the draft pool fell to free agency. It was Marrone’s favorite part of the process. Every year he coached in the NFL, an undrafted free agent was added to either the practice squad or 53-man roster.‘That’s important,’ Marrone said last Friday, a sense of urgency rippling through his voice. ‘Some of those free agents have developed into stars, when you look around the NFL.’This year, though, that process is disrupted. On March 12, the NFL announced a lockout of its players by the league’s 32 owners. Nearly two months later, after some twists in its path, the lockout remains in effect. The lockout closes all free agency and trade dealings between teams. And right now, the 2011 NFL season remains in limbo.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe NFL still held its 2011 Draft last week, but teams cannot sign their draftees or other newly minted free agents that were not drafted. And it’s something that troubles Marrone.‘I worry from my opinion, as a former player, as a former coach,’ Marrone said. ‘If they don’t have this free agency and they don’t clear it up afterward, who is that potential player that could have been?’On April 25, U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson temporarily lifted the lockout after it had stretched to a period of 45 days. Hours later, the owners reinstated the lockout. On Monday, the NFL filed a brief with the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis that said the lockout should remain in permanent effect until the two sides — players and owners — work out a new Collective Bargaining Agreement.With Syracuse, the lockout affects both new draftees and past stars. For the newly drafted, it’s a matter of when their contract will come. For the undrafted, it’s a waiting game. And it’s a matter of waiting to see what any potential new CBA would do for an improvement in the NFL’s lackluster pension plan for already established and former players.Most associated with SU do not expect the lockout to cast its shadow over an entire NFL season. Too much is at stake in a $9 billion industry.But until that shadow departs, doubt remains.‘The longer it lasts, the worse off we’ll be,’ said former SU center Ryan Bartholomew, who went undrafted last weekend. ‘But I think they’ll get something done.’‘Sooner or later’Doug Hogue believes one simple switch got him to this point. Buried in Greg Robinson’s depth chart at running back at Syracuse, what happened Saturday seemed unfathomable.Saturday, the Detroit Lions selected Hogue with the 157th overall pick in the 2011 NFL Draft — the 26th pick in the fifth round.Hogue said he owes all of it to Marrone for moving him from running back to linebacker. Otherwise, he might be in the same uncertain state as many of his fellow seniors from this past season’s Pinstripe Bowl-winning SU team.‘I give him all the credit,’ Hogue said. ‘When it comes down to it, Coach Marrone saw something that nobody else saw. He made the move. Coach Robinson had me at running back. … He moved me to defense, and it worked out the best for me.’Hogue was one of two members of last year’s Syracuse team to be selected in the draft. The other, running back Delone Carter, went 119th overall — the 22nd pick in the fourth round — to the Indianapolis Colts. Missing from the fray were Bartholomew, linebacker Derrell Smith, punter Rob Long and defensive back/punt returner Mike Holmes.Those players now have to wait until the labor situation is resolved before even talking to any of the 32 NFL teams.‘No matter what,’ Carter said of his teammates, ‘their time and opportunity is coming. Because they’ve worked too hard. And we worked too hard as a senior class to not get what we all worked for. It’s coming. Sooner or later.’Ending on holdFor Rob Long, the fairytale comes to life if he’s able to punt in the NFL next season.‘It’d be very gratifying,’ Long said of the potential of punting in an NFL game. ‘Obviously, just to show what is possible and what can be accomplished. To get to that point, it’d be gratifying if I hadn’t gone through everything. You throw that all in, and it would just make everything sweeter.’Long stood among SU’s undrafted last weekend. Through everything he did to overcome the brain cancer with which he was diagnosed in December, he hopes he gets a chance to finally get back on the field in a game situation.Bob Long, Rob’s father, remembers the toll it took on the Long family for more than three months — and how it made the family stronger in the end. There were the five-day-a-week treatments for nearly two months. There were the dietary changes Rob made at his nutritionist’s advice.Bob made the trip to Syracuse with his son for the university’s Pro Day, when Long kicked in front of NFL scouts. It was the first time Long punted in a formal setting since the Orange’s regular-season finale against Boston College, after weeks of kicking at Downington West High School’s field in his hometown.‘He knew he had a goal to meet,’ Bob Long said of his son. ‘He knew what he had to do to get there.’During the draft, Bartholomew found anything and everything to do rather than sit in front of a television all weekend. He cleaned his room. He cleaned other areas in his home in Maryland.When he finally ran out of places to clean, he would peek at his grandmother’s reactions to the draft, as she stared at it intently on the screen. Judging from her reactions and the absence of phone calls on his end, Bartholomew knew his name wasn’t flashing across the screen.‘She was the one watching it,’ Bartholomew said. ‘I was just trying to do other things.’Bartholomew said six teams contacted him during the scouting process to express interest, but none ended up selecting him. After the Pinstripe Bowl, Bartholomew ventured to Florida to train for the combine with SU cornerback Da’Mon Merkerson and the linebacker Smith.For two months in Florida, the three were trained in drills specific to the combine, rather than football-specific drills. They ate certain foods, lifted weights different ways from week to week and worked a lot with their technique. Their performances in the combine confirmed the training paid off. But it wasn’t enough.‘It’s very confusing,’ Smith said of the NFL labor situation. ‘Hopefully, they settle. … But, I mean, you can never be so sure, because we’re not in the courtroom.’Bartholomew and Smith believe the labor situation will eventually be resolved. So do Bob and Rob Long. Until he gets on the field, though, Rob won’t consider the fairytale ending a guarantee.‘It’s a big concern,’ Long said. ‘The next step on any given year would be to go through the free-agency process. I know I could get signed with that. … It’s something I’ve kept a close eye on.’Eye on the pastIn 2009, Mike Charles walked into the Doral Country Club in Doral, Fla. for the Dolphins’ 25-year anniversary celebration of their 1984-85 season, when they reached the Super Bowl.Immediately, Charles, a former Syracuse defensive tackle from 1979-83, noticed two players missing — defensive back Gerald Small and running back Andra Franklin.They were dead. There were others who had serious health issues.‘We need to give guys some help,’ Charles said. ‘We need to give guys some more light at the end of the tunnel.’Charles represents how the lockout affects Syracuse’s past players. As a former NFL player, Charles advocates the need for increased pension funds for retired players.Future pension plans have been a major issue in the fight over a new CBA. In March, NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith said the league contributes ‘zero’ to player pensions. The league responded by saying the owners have contributed more than $2.7 billion in the past 10 years to player pensions, according to an Associated Press article from March 30.Charles, now 48, said he doesn’t yet need to collect his pension fund because he has a steady income. He founded All Pro Locksmith, LLC, in Glendale, Ariz., in 2008.He says he has the same problems as every other retiree. Aches and pains. No cartilage in his knee.But he can’t say the same for many of his peers, as he rifles off a list of ailments — diabetes, cancer, prostate issues — that have afflicted former players he knows and have not been fully addressed.‘There are so many different things,’ Charles said. ‘They need to do something to address it.’In early March, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell sent a letter to every current NFL player stating that the owners’ latest proposal to players would have guaranteed more than 2,000 former players an immediate 60 percent pension increase, according to the AP article.Without an agreement now, though, a pension plan remains on hold. And those who have left the NFL remain on hold, much like those currently trying to get in.‘You have guys walking with canes,’ Charles said, ‘and they’re my age.’Uncertain futureThe one pick Bartholomew made sure to watch in the NFL Draft was its last. He saw Rice defensive end Cheta Ozougwu go off the board with pick No. 254.Ozougwu became ‘Mr. Irrelevant,’ the nickname given to the final pick in the draft each year. For as long as the lockout continues, Ozougwu will stand as the last player to be associated with a team.And even though his path comes with uncertainty, Bartholomew hoped and prayed he wouldn’t be picked last.‘I was happy it wasn’t me,’ Bartholomew said. ‘… I was just hoping I wouldn’t get picked at that point, so I could pick a situation that would be good for me.’But the uncertainty lends itself to questions. Marrone, a former offensive lineman, sympathizes with Bartholomew’s plight. As an offensive line coach, he could rank offensive linemen from No. 1 to 100. But since he didn’t have a sense of the entire scope of the draft, he couldn’t pin where those offensive linemen should go off the board.But if Marrone got it wrong and ranked too many linemen to get drafted, he could always find that one player in free agency to make the practice squad or team. Now, the SU head coach wonders if one of his former players is the piece that will never fall into place if the labor situation never gets resolved.‘How does that player still maintain that dream and development of becoming an NFL player, when after the last round is over Saturday, it ends?’ Marrone said. ‘I feel for that because we may be talking about one of our players that way.‘I think a lot of them, if not all of them, might be in a camp. And it might not work out that way.’bplogiur@syr.edu Published on May 2, 2011 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Commentslast_img read more

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Matadors prove too much for Trojans once again

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first_imgIt’s been a freefall over the last month for the former No. 1 USC men’s volleyball team and the Trojans couldn’t do much to stop that last night.Strong effort · Junior opposite hitter Murphy Troy led the Trojans with 25 kills during the Trojans’ tough 3-1 loss to Cal State Northridge. – Nathaniel Gonzalez | Daily Trojan “We embarrassed the university and the athletic department tonight,” USC coach Bill Ferguson said. “I was going to say something about nobody coming to watch us and I can see why right now. I don’t know why anyone would come to watch us.”No. 6 USC (8-6, 5-4 Mountain Pacific Sports Federation), lost its fifth match in the last seven games last night when it was picked apart by No. 5 Cal State Northridge 3-1 (30-25, 24-30, 30-22, 30-21).Aside from the second set, USC was never really in the match. CSUN, who won for the 16th straight time against the Trojans, had eight point leads in the middle of both the third and fourth sets, and USC was never able to recover.“It’s lack of effort, lack of focus, lack of heart,” Ferguson said.After winning the second set, it looked like USC was ready to turn the match around. But the Matadors built up a 19-10 lead. The Trojans were able to cut that lead in half, to 20-16, but just as they seemed to do done all night, the Trojans served into the net to halt their momentum.“We definitely ended a lot of our own momentum tonight, whether it was a bad pass or bad serve after a big run,” junior opposite hitter Murphy Troy said.USC also was unable to get anything going on the offensive end. The Trojans had a .043 hitting percentage in the first set and a .156 hitting percentage for the entire match. It seemed like almost everytime Troy and sophomore outside hitter Tony Ciarelli went for a kill, a Matador was waiting on the other side of the net to dig it.“I was not happy with any phase of what we were doing, other than the fact that our uniforms were clean and we matched,” Ferguson said. “We can’t play offense to save our life right now.”One area USC is struggling at is the second outside hitter position, complimenting Ciarelli. Junior Tri Bourne started the season in the position, but injuries during the fall impeded his progress, and has since been pulled for freshman Maddison McKibbin.McKibbin started his second game last night but had trouble early, especially in the first set when he posted a -.400 hitting percentage. He was able to find some kills later in the match, but still finished with a -.142 hitting percentage. Despite his struggles, Ferguson opted to leave him in the match.“Part of his problems statistically happened at the beginning. He got about three or four poor sets at the beginning of the match,” Ferguson said. “Part of [the reason I kept him in there] was his passing. But Maddison’s still trying to find his way.”He’s not alone. The Trojans are searching for their way as well.last_img read more

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Trojans pick up four-star offensive lineman commit

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first_imgFour-star offensive lineman Cyrus Hobbi (Scottsdale, Ariz.), the nation’s top guard prospect according to ESPN, announced his commitment to USC during a Friday afternoon press conference held at Saguargo High School and televised regionally on Fox Sports Arizona.“I’ll be attending the University of Southern California,” Hobbi said in a story published on USCFootball.com. “It was a very difficult decision with all of the schools I had to choose from.”Hobbi had been deliberating between USC, and Arizona State and UCLA.“I was very impressed with all of the coaches and I had a great time meeting everybody, but at the end of the day going out there to USC,” Hobbi said in the same story. “I knew it was the place for me. Walking out to the Coliseum and seeing all of these great, great players I’m going to be playing with soon with the recruiting class they’re going to be getting … we’re going to be good in the next couple of years.”With holes on the offensive line stemming from the departures of starters Kristofer O’Dowd, Butch Lewis and Tyron Smith, Hobbi is expected to compete for a starting spot immediately.“We’re going to start winning games. I’m very confident and very excited in my decision to go to USC.”last_img read more

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South Florida’s Winston Barnes is recipient of 2018 Jamaica National Honor

By on August 31, 2020

first_imgIn sparse recognition of the Jamaica Diaspora, City of Miramar Commissioner and Radio WAVS veteran broadcaster, Winston Barnes, is one of only two Jamaican Americans who are among 130 recipients of hors and awards announced by the Jamaican government on August 6, the 56th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence.Barnes was awarded the Order of Distinction in the rank of Commander, for “dedication to the Jamaican music industry and media.”Congresswoman Yvette Clarke Caribbean American Congresswoman from New York, Yvette Clarke was also honored with the Order of Distinction – Commander. The congresswoman was honored for “Distinguished contribution in safeguarding the Interests of Jamaican nationals in the USA Diaspora on immigration matters.”Belafonte receives highest honor The highest honor awarded, the Jamaica Order of Merit went to the perennially popular Jamaican-American entertainer Harry Belafonte and civil rights activist for “outstanding contribution in the field of music.” The Jamaican honors and awards will be presented to the recipients at a special ceremony on the grounds of Kings House, the residence of Jamaica’s Governor General on National Heroes Day, October 15. Order of Jamaica The second highest honor, the Order of Jamaica, was awarded to:Godfrey Dyer, Chairman of the Tourism Enhancement Fund, for “exceptional contribution in the field of tourism”; Chief Executive Officer of the Jamaica National Group Earl Jarrett, for “exceptional contribution to the banking and financial sectors, public service and volunteerism”; singer/song writer and actress Grace Jones for “exceptional contribution in the field of Entertainment internationally”; and Giuseppe Francesco Maffessanti for his “exceptional contribution to the construction industry, social development, welfare and philanthropy.”Other recipients of OD-Commander Among those have been also honored with the Order of  Distinction in the rank of  Commander are Michael Ammar Junior; Olympian swimmer Alia Atkinson; Mayor of  Montego Bay Homer Davis; Justices Courtney Daye and Leighton Pusey; Trade Unionist Senator Kavan Gayle; politician Maxine Henry-Wilson, business woman Jean Lowrie-Chin,and Jamaica’s high commissioner to the United Kingdom Seth George Ramocan.Recipients OD – Officer  Some of the recipients of  the Order of  Distinction in the rank of  Officer include entertainer Winston “Yellowman” Foster, broadcaster Dermot Hussey; cultural commentator Barbara Blake-Hannah; writer/storyteller Joan Andrea Hutchinson, former Deputy Commissioner of  Police Novelette Grant and Chief  Education Officer in the Education Ministry Dr Grace McLean.last_img read more

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Ghana is the highest exporter of footballers in Africa – Report

By on August 29, 2020

first_imgGhana is the highest exporter of footballers from Africa in 2018 – ReportGhana has ranked number 1 in Africa as the country to have transferred the most footballers abroad in the year 2018.The country shipped out 39 players to rank 6th globally in 2018. Only Brazil, Spain, Argentina, Colombia and Germany have transferred more players abroad in the same period with Brazil topping the list with 64 players, according to a report by the CIES Football Observatory.This Monthly Report analyses the presence of expatriate footballers in 147 leagues from 98 national associations. Five championships from five different countries were added in comparison to the study carried out in 2018.In terms of the number of players abroad overall, Ghana ranked number 12 in the world with 286 players playing abroad. Nigeria is Africa’s highest exporter of footballers with 361 of them currently playing abroad, coming in at number 10.Brazil is at the top of the rankings for countries exporting footballers. In total, 1,330 players having grown up in Brazil play in the 147 leagues covered in this report. Brazilians are present in 85 associations out of 98.last_img read more

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Charles Taylor disappointed with Herbert Addo sack

By on August 28, 2020

first_imgFormer Hearts of Oak playmaker Charles Taylor has hit out at the Management of the club for sacking Coach Herbert Addo in the face of poor results.The Phobians parted ways with the manager earlier this week following a string of poor results.Hearts lie in a precarious position on the league after a disastrous league campaign which saw many critics calling for the head of Herbert Addo.But Taylor believes the players should rather be highlighted for the team’s woes.“If you sack a coach, you haven’t solved the problem. Sometimes the problem is not coach but the players. If you have bad players the coach cannot do any magic for the team.””During our time, they hardly paid us but we played our hearts out because we knew football was our profession and the only thing we knew how to do. I can bet that during our days, any ordinary person could coach the team because the players were good. ”But today, all Hearts can boast of are average players. So they have to find a way to get good players for the club and stop blaming the coaches anytime things go wrong.”Taylor was part of Herbrt Addo’s team that won the league 2002 with the highlight being a 3-0 thrashing of Kotoko in Accra.–last_img read more

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