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Supermarkets, National retailers fined

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgThe Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets,through the work of its Consumer Protection inspectors, turns up about a dozensuch violations each year.  In mostcases, pricing discrepancies are minor and largely due to human error.  The Agency advises consumers to alwaysbe aware of what they are paying for items. Price Chopper St. Albans           $.10-.30                   Three major supermarket chains, one drug store chain, andone other national retailer have been cited and penalized for violating Vermontretail pricing laws.  Shaws, PriceChopper, and Grand Union Supermarkets; Rite Aid Pharmacy; and JC Penney have allagreed to pay penalties ranging from $1,000 to $3,500 for overcharging consumersfor items in their stores. Retailer          $2,255 For more information, contact Michael Duane, AssistantAttorney General, at (802) 828-3178, or Henry Marckres, Consumer ProtectionChief at the Agency of Agriculture at (802)828-3458. Price Chopper Essex               $.10-1.00                 “What concerns us is that these errors were on non-saleitems,” Assistant Attorney General Michael Duane said.  “When an item goes on sale, it isconceivable, albeit not acceptable, for a retailer to enter an incorrect pricewhen re-programming a scanner. However, when the error is on an ‘everyday’ price, that mistake isprotracted over a longer period of time, most often to the advantage of theretailer.” $1,035 The violations were discovered during routine surveys byinspectors from the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets.  In all five stores, inspectors foundthat prices at registers were higher than prices advertised on shelves forcertain items.  Those discrepanciesranged from $.02 to $14.  Aninvestigation found no evidence of intentional wrongdoing, but there werefactors about these discrepancies that concernedofficials. *Penalties are determined based on the number ofviolations at an individual store $.10-.40                   $1,035 JCPenny Berlin                       $1.50-14.00               Shaws Williston            Price Chopper Colchester           $.02-.29                   $1,605 $.02-14.00              center_img $1,305 $2,255 Price Chopper Burlington           $.10-1.00                 $.04-2.00                 $5,755 (More) $2,105 Supermarket Chains Fined Nearly $20,000 for Violating VTRetail Pricing Laws $2,550 Rite-Aid St. Johnsbury              $.10-1.00     Grand Union Swanton               $.10-1.00                 Total                “Our advice to consumers is to be vigilant in checkingout that the shelf price actually rings up at the same price at checkout,”Agriculture Secretary Steve Kerr says. “This is especially so when customers buy many items at one time, like insupermarkets.  Our Vermont retailstores generally have good track records, but human error can occur, and we wantto know about it.” Range of ScannerDiscrepancies            Penalty* $19,900 Shaws Waitsfield        last_img read more

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Vermont Tech Program wins Stevie® Award in 5th Annual American Business Awards

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first_imgPresident Ty Handy of Vermont Tech is pleased to announce that one of the signature business/labor/education partnership programs delivered at the college — The Verizon/CWA/IBEW Next Step Program — won the Stevie Award® for Best Human Resource Team in the 2007 American Business Awards on June 11, 2007.Stevie Awards were presented in over 40 categories including Best Overall Company, Best Executive, and Best Corporate Social Responsibility Program. More than 2,000 entries from companies of all sizes and in virtually every industry were submitted for consideration.Hailed as “the business world’s own Oscars” (New York Post,April 27, 2005), The American Business Awards are the only national, all-encompassing awards program honoring great performances in business.In winning the Stevie Award®, this education program for line maintenance personnel beat out other finalists including DHL Express and Marriott. Dan Crocitto, Verizon’s Next Step Program Co-Director was presented the Stevie Award®, before a packed ballroom at Marriott Marquis in New York City. In accepting the Stevie Award®, Crocitto said, “The award acknowledges the successes of our educational partnership and the quality of work and creative talent of every individual on our team; a team that has maintained a clear focus on the value of an education and the significant impact it has on the individual students, as well as the program’s partners.”Dr. Joseph N. Joyce Jr., Director the Next Step Program in New England noted, “The selection of Next Step in this competitive process is testimony to the success of this pioneering corporate, union and educational initiative.”Next Step Program:By the mid-1990s the senior leaders of NYNEX (now Verizon) and its two principal employee unions, the Communications Workers of America (CWA) and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), knew they must adapt if the company was to survive and thrive in a business environment of deregulation, global competition, and rapid technological change.The Next Step Program (NSP) became the vehicle for achieving the desired results. The company and the union together turned to partner public institutions, like Vermont Technical College, and others throughout New York and New England for program development and implementation. In total, a coalition of twenty-five colleges teamed to develop, accredit, and deliver a common AAS degree program at twenty-eight locations.Today, the Next Step Program boasts:Over 3,200 graduates, 21,152 applicants since its inception.On average, 7 employees applying for each available seat.Participants who surpass their national counterparts in higher GPA ranges.A participant retention rate of 75%, versus a 48% national rate, and 30% of graduates who continue their formal education.The Program takes participants four years to complete, taking classes one day per week as part of their regular work duty. It is funded entirely by Verizon, and managed by Co-Directors from the company, the Communications Workers of America (CWA), and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW).last_img read more

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Central Vermont Public Service Corp declares common and preferred stock dividends

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first_imgOn February 14, 2011 the Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (NYSE: CV) Board of Directors approved the following resolution: That out of reserved and unrestricted earnings of the Company a quarterly dividend at the rate of twenty-three cents ($.23) per share is hereby declared on the issued and outstanding shares of Common Stock, $6 Par Value, payable May 13, 2011 to stockholders of record at the close of business May 3, 2011.Also, the board approved that out of the reserved and unrestricted retained earnings of the Company quarterly dividends on the Preferred Stock, $100 Par Value, of $1.04 per share on the 4.15% Dividend Series, $1.16 per share on the 4.65% Dividend Series, $1.18 per share on the 4.75% Dividend Series, and $1.34375 per share on the 5.375% Dividend Series, are hereby declared payable April 1, 2011 to stockholders of record at the close of business March 22, 2011. RUTLAND, VT–(Marketwire – February 14, 2011) –last_img read more

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As roads open, CVPS crews pour into the area

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first_imgAugust 31, 2011 ‘ 5 pm. With more than 270 bucket trucks, diggers, track and other all-terrain vehicles, Central Vermont Public Service crews accessed some of the isolated areas in central and southern Vermont today.As of 5 pm, more than 63,000 of the 73,000-plus customer outages have been restored, with 9,500 remaining. Addison and Bennington County outages were restored today, while work continues in Windsor, Rutland, Windham and Orange counties.Governor Peter Shumlin today visited the CVPS storm command center on Post Road in Rutland before he went to the survey road and electrical system damage in central Vermont. CVPS President Larry Reilly and Senior Vice President of Operations, Engineering and Customer Service Joe Kraus took the governor on a tour of central scheduling, the planning chief’s area, and the logistics planning center. Matt McCoy, a retired brigadier general in the Army National Guard, who heads up CVPS’s logistics group, told the governor that the team delivered more than 800 lunches to our field workers through the state today.‘We really appreciate the administration’s support, especially the support of the Agency of Transportation, the Department of Public Service and Vermont Emergency Management,’ Kraus said. ‘We could not do this without the assistance and support of our state and town officials, and of course our customers, which have been wonderful.’CVPS crews poured into the town of Rochester to cheers from residents who were gathered at the town offices. Crews fanned out across the town and neighboring communities, putting up downed power lines and planning how to rebuild lines that were washed away.  Meanwhile, a small army of electrical maintenance workers began work to clean up and rebuild the Rochester Substation, the heart of the local grid. A portable substation was also dispatched.Many workers were showered with well-wishes.  ‘I think I’ve been told ‘I love you’ more in the last five hours than in the last five years,’ said CVPS spokesman Steve Costello, who went into Rochester with line crews and delivered hundreds of local Vermont newspapers to residents desperate for information.Crews in Windham County poured into the East Dover area today with bucket trucks, two digger vehicles and tree workers to begin work to build a new temporary line to get power to East Dover village, which they hope to complete tomorrow. CVPS workers have also been clearing road in that area as they go. Crews also delivered poles to the Wardsboro and Jamaica area on Route 100 between Route 30 and Wardsboro village to do all the repair work they could, in anticipation of Route 100 road construction work.‘We’re doing any repair work we can do now, so that when we do get access through Route 100, we can energize as many customers as possible as quickly as we can, once we have access,’ said Brattleboro Operations Supervisor Dave Miller.Crews out of our Springfield District poured into the towns of Weston, Chester, Cavendish, Rockingham and Cambridgeport. ‘We had bucket trucks, diggers, excavators and all-terrain vehicles all throughout these areas today, and in some cases we are rebuilding new lines in new places,’ said Springfield Operations Supervisor Ed Whittemore.‘Crews made really good progress in Mt. Holly and Killington today,’ said Operations Supervisor Chris Gandin. Crews brought nine transmission and distribution bucket trucks up the mountain, along with a digger bucket, track bucket vehicle, four-wheeler and another all-terrain vehicle, along with tree contractors.CVPS continued to caution that complete restoration remains dependent on road access, and could take weeks for customers who are still isolated. A specific CVPS support team is continuing to work on travel strategies with local and state Agency of Transportation officials to coordinate alternative access points to washed out routes throughout the state, but it’s difficult work and will take time.Crews and support staff have been working 18- and 20-hour shifts since before the storm began, and will continue to do so until the restoration work is done.  CVPS urged Vermonters to use extra caution around waterways, many of which are still flowing at very high levels.  ‘A lot of the smaller rivers, creeks and brooks may have dropped back considerably, but the water is still moving much faster than normal,’ said Mike Scarzello, CVPS’s generation asset manager.If a customer’s home or business was flooded, and their electric service panel was affected by water, it has to be examined by a qualified electrician before CVPS can restore service.Up-to-date outage numbers (by town) can be found at: http://www.cvps.com/CustomerService/outages/(link is external) and http://vtoutages.com/(link is external) What’s left of the Rochester Substation stands covered with corn stalks, grass, rocks, mud and weeds in the mountain town along Route 100, its fence and sign knocked down by flood waters.  CVPS crews are rebuilding the heavily damaged substation and bringing a portable substation in to try to restore power as quickly as possible. Photo: Steve Costello, CVPSlast_img read more

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