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Cubana Air Disaster victims remembered

By on January 17, 2020

first_imgA special commemoration was held at the University of Guyana to mark the 40th anniversary of the Cubana Air Disaster which claimed the lives of 73 people, including 11 Guyanese.At Thursday’s remembrance ceremony, Cuban Ambassador Julio Cesar Gonsalez Marchante said that his country shared the pain of the Disaster with its fellow Caribbean nations. Marchante also noted that the Region will achieve victory in the fight against terrorism.“The pain is shared; the pain is multiplied. We in Cuba mourn our beloved ones…this legacy is a beacon and guidance because we are certain that in this fight against terrorism, we will win,” the Ambassador noted.Several Government Ministers and a delegation from Barbados were also present at the observance.Cuban Ambassador Julio Cesar Gonsalez Marchante addressing the gathering on ThursdaySome of the Guyanese who perished in the October 1976 bombingGuyanese President David Granger reminded that the attack was against the freedom of the Caribbean people.“The Cubana terrorist attack ensnared the Caribbean Community in a Cold War conflict, which was not of the Region’s making. The terrorist attack constituted an assault on the freedom-loving peoples of the Caribbean [and] their national interests,” he noted.While recalling the events of that fateful day, the Head of State also expressed that the remaining suspect must be charged for the deadly attack.“The Heads of State and Government of the Caribbean Community and Cuba, at the Second Caricom-Cuba Summit in Barbados in December 2005, urged the Government of the United States of America to consider favourably, the request for the extradition of the suspect to Venezuela in order to ensure that he is brought to justice on charges of terrorism, in accordance with States’ obligations under international law and their own national legislation,” Granger explained.On October 6, 1976, Cubana de Aviación flight CU 455 exploded just 11 minutes after take-off from the Grantley Adams International Airport, Barbados.Those who perished were 57 Cubans, five North Koreans, and Guyanese Ann Nelson, Jacqueline Williams, Sabrina Harripaul, Rita Thomas, Margaret Bradshaw, Violet Thomas, Rawle Thomas, Raymond Persaud, Harold Norton, Gordon Sobha and Seshnarine Kumar.Four men were subsequently arrested for the bombing. Two were later sentenced to 20 years in prison in a trial held in neighbouring Venezuela, while two others were acquitted for the reported two explosions on the plane.last_img read more

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Liberian Artist off to Dayton, Ohio for Art Residency

By on January 14, 2020

first_imgThe Dayton Sister City Committee (DSCC) in conjunction with the Dayton Society of Artists (DSA) is pleased to host international artist, Patrick Gono, from Monrovia, Liberia, one of Dayton’s six sister cities. Gono will be the first artist-in-residence for the Dayton Society of Artists and will have studio space at the Front Street Building Co. Gono will be in Dayton for the majority of July, 2019 and will have an exhibit of his work in the DSA’s Project Space at their High Street Gallery beginning July 5.Gono is a self-taught artist, inspired early in his childhood by cartoon characters namely from the Marvel and Disney corporations. His passion for art got him in trouble to the point of failing sixth grade, but that would not hold him back for long and he received a double promotion in his eighth year of school. As he grew, he found inspiration in nature and artists that came before him such as Renoir and Rossetti. He won the Value of Biodiversity art competition held at the US Embassy in Monrovia in 2011.Gono now lives in Monrovia, creating hyper-realistic pieces and desires to make a name for Liberia and its people through his art.Artist-in-residence programs give artists the opportunity to live and work outside of their usual environments, providing them with time to reflect, research, or produce work. During a residency, artists can explore new locations, different cultures, and experiment with different materials.“Being selected for the artist-in-residence for the DSCC and the DSA is like the final picture of my dream of bringing light to show the colors of peace we need to shine and prosper, to show the power and bond of art, and to help others discover their true potential,” Gono said. When asked about how he felt about the opportunity to be the artist-in-residence he answered, “This is truly a dream come true… As I am the bridge between two cities now, my aim is to make sure my pillars and cables and concrete are solid so as to ensure a lifelong connection between Dayton and Monrovia.”Dayton, through the DSCC, has been a sister city of Monrovia since 1972; however, this relationship has been dormant for over six years. Recently a renewed interest in Monrovia, led by the DSCC Monrovian Chair, Mr. Thomas F. Siafa, Sr., has brought forth the partnership with the Dayton Society of Artists, which led to the artist-in-residency program. Thomas Siafa works for the Dayton Metropolitan Housing Authority, now doing business as Greater Dayton Premier Management, as a Safety and Compliance Officer. Siafa has resided in the Dayton areas for over twenty-nine years, and for the love of his native land, Liberia, he visits Monrovia frequently on mission trips.While Gono is in Dayton, he will exhibit his work in the High Street Gallery’s Project Space alongside the DSA’s show Crossing Boundaries. Both will open July 5 from 6-9pm. The gallery is open from 12-5pm Friday and Saturday as well as being open on First Fridays from 6-9pm. The gallery is located at 48 High Street in Dayton.Nineteen artists from Monrovia applied for the residency. Friend of the DSCC, Ed Dixon, has compiled some of the artwork of other artists who were not selected, which can be found at https://eadgallery.com/2019/04/21/art-from-our-sister-city-monrovia/.The DSA and DSCC will also be collecting art supplies, which are scarce and more expensive in Liberia than they are in the US, to send back to Monrovia with Gono. To make a donation of supplies to send to Monrovia, folks are asked to kindly contact Amanda Grieve, Gallery Director of the DSA, at 937-228-4532 or by email at director@daytondsa.org.The Dayton Society of Artists has been serving local artists since 1938 and their mission is to connect, support, and educate artists and the community.The mission of the Dayton Sister City Committee is to provide community leadership, promote Dayton internationally, and to increase global awareness of Dayton residents through developing and maintaining active Sister City relationships.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) – Advertisement – Patrick Gono will be the first artist-in-residence for the Dayton Society of Artists, beginning July 2019.last_img read more

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7-year-old 10th victim of Bronx fire

By on January 11, 2020

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! NEW YORK – A 7-year-old girl lost her two-day battle for life, becoming the 10th victim of a devastating Bronx fire that also killed all her siblings and her mother. Asimi Soumare died late Friday as the bodies of other victims were being prepared for their funerals Monday: Asimi’s twin baby sisters, 4-year-old brother and mother, as well as five of the girl’s cousins – children of Manthia and Moussa Magassa, who shared the three-story brick home with the Soumare family. Mamadou Soumare, a taxi driver who received a frantic call from his doomed wife on the night of the fire, has now lost his spouse and all of their children. “I don’t know what I’m going to do,” Soumare said hours after the death of 42-year-old Fatoumata, 4-year-old Djibril and the 7-month-old twins. last_img read more

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Trial by fire

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first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! THE fire that ravaged Griffith Park on Tuesday charred more than 600 acres, but it could have been a lot worse had it not been for the hard work of many people. There are the firefighters who fought the flames, the police officers who helped evacuate residents, the zoo personnel who kept the animals safe and many others who helped in various ways. Wildfires are a fact of life in Southern California, and this year’s combination of low rainfall and projected high temperatures makes it likely that more wildfires are in the forecast. This is a great concern, but one mitigated by the awesome display of commitment and skill from crews of city workers this week.last_img read more

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GOLF NEWS: THEY’RE FIGHTING WITH EACH OTHER OVER BIRDS AT OTWAY

By on December 27, 2019

first_imgOtway Golf News Well the temperature may have dipped but the competition was hot in the first battle of the year to secure the bird for the Christmas 2014 dinner table.A good turnout ensured that standards were high, as was the scoring, with even an eagle at the third not good enough for one team to catch the winning score of ten under par. The high standard to aim for was set by the winning team of Arthur Morrison, Martin Duffy, Patsy Gallagher and Dan Canning, who can now relax and enjoy their Sunday golf with the pressure to win off their backs.It’s all to play for again next Sunday, and remember the Sunday scrambles are open, so all comers are welcome to try their hand and enter before 12.45 for a one pm tee-off, tel no for entries 074 9158319.GOLF NEWS: THEY’RE FIGHTING WITH EACH OTHER OVER BIRDS AT OTWAY was last modified: October 7th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:golfNoticesOtwaySportlast_img read more

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Saxton Takes Third At 800 Meters At Holiday Inn Invitational

By on December 24, 2019

first_imgLINCOLN, Neb. – The Drake University track and field teams resumed their indoor season Friday evening at the Holiday Inn Invitational in Lincoln, Neb., with Emma Huston (Des Moines, Iowa) winning the mile.Huston’s personal best time of 4:55.69 bested the field by nearly six seconds and is the sixth-fastest time in school history.  Huston overcame a tough start and slow pace early in the race to pull away from the pack with 500 meters left.”Emma started her season off great winning the mile and separated herself from the field,” said Drake head coach Natasha Kaiser-Brown.Also on the track for the women, freshman Meghan Kearney (Kansas City, Mo.) took second place in the 800 meters in 2:16.22. The field events were highlighted by Kayla Bell (Bolingbrook, Ill.) taking fourth in the long jump with a leap of 18-7.”Kayla’s speed on the runway has really developed,” Kaiser-Brown said.For the men’s team, James Saxton (La Crosse, Wis.) continued his indoor season by finishing third in the 800 meters with a time of 1:54.54.”James fought hard in the 800 meters and it won’t be long before we see a big drop in his time,” Kaiser-Brown said.The Bulldogs continue competition at the Holiday Inn Invite on Saturday with events resuming at noon. Holiday Inn Invitational – Jan. 15, 2016Lincoln, Neb. Drake Women’s Results 60 Meters (Prelims)13. Taryn Rolle, 7.9425. Rai Ahmed-Green, 8.12 800 Meters2. Meghan Kearney, 2:16.226. Laura Gann, 2:17.4417. Shelby Varney, 2:34.81 1,000 Meters8. Kayla Giuliano, 3:07.89 Mile1. Emma Huston, 4:55.69 3,000 Meters7. Bailee Cofer, 10:27.9014. Taylor Scholl, 10:41.18 60-Meter Hurdles (Prelims)13. Virginia Hill, 9.37 High Jump3. Taylor Patton, 5-3 Pole Vault5. Christina LeMunyon, 10-6 Long Jump4. Kayla Bell, 18-710. Taryn Rolle, 17-7 Holiday Inn Invitational – Jan. 15, 2016Lincoln, Neb. Drake Men’s Results 60 Meters (Prelims)7. Demetrius Shelton, 7.0017. Aaron Chier, 7.1019. Kendall Owens, 7.16 800 Meters3. James Saxton, 1:54.547. George Webb, 1:57.1824. Alec Bognar, 2:04.48 1,000 Meters11. John Freeman, 2:37.68 3,000 Meters25. Ali Jandal, 9:05.69 60-Meter Hurdles (Prelims)19. Dominic Lombardi, 8.7329. Tyler Zak, 9.10 High Jump4. Forest Moses, 6-2.75 Pole Vault13. Adam Perkins, 12-6 Long Jump9. Johnathan Osifuye, 22-3.525. Ethan Turner, 18-7.25 Weight Throw18. Michael Dolan, 45-3.5   Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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R737m for South Africa’s small firms

By on December 18, 2019

first_imgInvestigate the possibility of partnering with retail chain stores as well as government feeding schemes to expand its reach further into rural areas.Improve a pre-loan support programme in partnership with the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and improve the uptake of its poorly performing credit guarantee scheme by July.Partner with more provincial development finance agencies to add to the current partnership with the Gauteng Enterprise Propeller.Expand the pilot project it has with the SA Institute of Chartered Accountants in a programme which takes young graduates and trains them in how to assist small businesses, from Gauteng to KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga.Roll out a further nine branches or satellite offices per year, which would be co- located within Seda or IDC branch offices, to add to the 11 regional offices the agency already has. Makhuvha said the cost of Sefa lending finance to business owners is also expected to fall – from 44c for every rand disbursed in 2013/14 to 25c for every year lent out in 2017/18. Sefa will run awareness road shows with financial intermediaries – starting with Alexandra and Sandton in Johannesburg this month and running to February next year, with two road shows to be held in the North West. The IDC has committed over R987-million as a shareholder’s loan to the agency until the end of 2014/15, with an option of a further R400-million capital injection in two years time. IDC chief executive Geoffrey Qhena said the transaction had been structured as a loan and not a grant because there had to be a chance for the IDC to recoup the loan to ensure that Sefa funds sustainable businesses. Committee members questioned the use of retail finance intermediaries, pointing out that they were concerned that using intermediaries resulted in driving up the costs of lending for business owners. Committee chair Elsie Mmathulare Coleman said Economic Development Minister Ebrahim Patel had asked the committee to look more into the costs of lending through intermediaries. Source: SANews.gov.za 19 April 2013 South Africa’s Small Enterprise Finance Agency (Sefa) plans to disburse over R737- million to more than 15 000 small firms – most of these micro enterprises – by the end of the 2013/14 financial year, says Sefa chief executive Thakani Makhuvha. Briefing the National Assembly’s portfolio committee on economic development on its corporate plan for 2013/14 on Wednesday, Makhuvha – who was seconded from the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) in November last year to head the agency – said the targeted funding will help create over 18 000 jobs. In five years, the agency aims to have more than doubled lending and the number of business owners financed – with disbursements reaching almost R1.6-billion to over 34 000 small firms. Sefa lends between R500 and R5-million to small, micro and medium enterprises by way of three means – directly to business owners, via retail finance intermediaries and thirdly via banks through its using credit guarantee scheme. Sefa’s forerunner, the Khula guarantee scheme, ground to a virtual halt following the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, when the number of defaults spiralled, leading banks to steer away from the scheme. Sefa also aims to complete the development of its direct lending product – currently still being piloted at a number of sites around the country – by the end of November this year. Among Sefa’s other plans, the agency aims to: last_img read more

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Magic Wand – Geocache of the Week

By on December 17, 2019

first_imgMulti-CacheGC3KWJEby duck 43 Have you ever wished for a magic wand that could solve all of your problems with just a wave? While wielding this power in everyday life may only exist in fairy tales, you can experience the next best thing. Visit this Multi-Cache where your wish for a “magic” wand comes true to reveal the smiley for this Geocache of the Week! Image by duck 43 – Perth, Western Autstralia’s capital city, can be viewed in the background of GZThe backdrop for the Multi, Magic Wand, is the capital city of Perth in Western Australia (WA). Ground zero overlooks the Swan River, an idyllic estuary that contrasts the bustling metropolis of WA’s largest city. Cache owner, creative wizard, and Australia’s highest Favorited hider, duck 43 located the spot over six years ago. “It was such a lovely location, I simply had to come up with something special. At the time I was not an experienced hider and could not have imagined how popular this cache would become.”Image by Dark Energy – the wand is in close proximity to the cache containerThere are two stages to the Multi-Cache: one for the cache container and one for the key to access the log— the magic wand! Step aside Harry Potter and Fairy Godmother, this wand consists of a classic, black rod with an attractive special feature (no, not fairy dust). “I don’t know how I came up with the idea for the mechanism, but I knew I would have to use magnets to open the box,” duck 43 said of their creative process. The wand was specially made for this cache. The cache itself is nestled nearby under a natural, cave-like arch of foliage. It is comprised of an outer box (on which you can cast your spells) that provides protection for the inner Lock & Lock with logbook.Image by duck 43 – the container can be seen under a cave-like structure in the brushGeocachers can proclaim Alohomora! if they wish to astound young wizards with ‘sorcery’ in opening this cache, but the components all conform to the laws of physical science. “It is quite simple really. A magnet moves across, like a latch, and prevents the lid from opening. By sliding a magnet on the outside, it would move another one on the inside which would move into a position to become a locking bolt. To close it you simply place the wand magnet in a position to repel the internal magnet.” Image by duck 43 – geocache container placed with permissionThe combination of a beautiful venue and cache design have drawn geocachers from across the globe to the Multi, including from the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands. “We have a limited population in Western Australia, so most geocachers have found it but people from overseas and interstate put it on their priority list. It has been muggled a couple of times but generally not badly and I have been able to fix it. . .The favourable logs help to keep me motivated!” The attention garnered this cache with over 200 Favorite points, the current leader in Western Australia. We’re positive you’ll understand why!Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More Difficulty:3Terrain:1.5 Location:Western Australia, AustraliaS 32° 00.400 E 115° 50.109 SharePrint Related”Swan Valley Safe” GC2MRF0 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – February 21, 2011February 22, 2011In “Community”Harry Potters Abenteuer — Geocache of the weekMarch 22, 2017In “Community”Masca – Los Gigantes – Masca – a real adventure — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 20, 2017In “Community”last_img read more

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An Insider’s 11 Take-Aways from Companies Winning Industrial (IIoT) Cybersecurity

By on December 15, 2019

first_imgAs you read through blogs and articles about cybersecurity and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), it’s easy to get so focused on the complexities (and there are many), that you lose sight of the big picture. There is huge opportunity in this space—untapped by the existing IT cybersecurity players.To state it in the simplest terms, when protecting free consumer accounts like, Gmail or Facebook accounts, the motivation for investing in security is driven by certain objectives—protecting customer trust, avoiding an unpleasant hit to the company’s reputation, etc. These are, of course, real and important concerns. But when an industrial company is trying to protect a $10 million turbine, the economics of investing in security become very different—and much more straightforward. There’s a reason why much of current security investments are directed towards the industrial space: it’s an enormously promising market—and one where new innovations can have an enormous impact.GE Ventures, the venture capital subsidiary of General Electric, is one of the organizations that recognizes the large opportunities (and even greater responsibility) to lower costs and eliminate unplanned downtime for their customers. They have been working closely with industrial companies for decades. The company has also built longstanding trust relationships with customers and helps them take advantage of the industrial Internet and protect them from its inherent risks. They are rising to that challenge—their own Predix architecture, a platform that help to optimize industrial business processes, has an extensive security-in-depth strategy.In addition to the security-in-depth strategy on their platform, GE Ventures is always on the lookout for startups that are advancing the industrial cybersecurity art. According to them, there are some very talented ones out there. Of course, IIoT is not an easy market to break into for startups. Industrial networks are different than enterprise IT that makes them a terrible place for moonlighting—having a great product roadmap in traditional IT is not a birthright to succeed in industrial cybersecurity. But there are some commonalities among the most successful and promising startups in this space. Here are a few from GE Ventures’ perspective:1.) They know their stuff.There are lots of things That GE look at when evaluating a startup: A team with the right specialties. Differentiated technology. But the most important factor separating companies treading water from those already swimming laps is that they are staffed top-to-bottom by people who “get” industrial applications.The most successful startups have a kind of institutional knowledge of industrial control systems (ICS)—often gleaned from working in industrial in their previous careers. They’ve learned important lessons (sometimes the hard way): They know the market. They understand its constraints. They understand through experience the attack surface and exposure. And they always, always keep their eye on the ball: the business continuity of the customer.2.) They take the IIoT Hippocratic Oath: First, do no harm.No matter what they’re working on, successful IIoT startups never lose sight of their customers’ primary objective: this machine cannot fail. Whatever work they’re doing to secure a system, they know that it absolutely cannot slow down or knock out industrial assets. They create a security layer that’s at least as agile, if not more so, than the devices and systems it’s protecting.3.) They don’t make things harder for the customer.Successful IIoT startups know that their target customer has been doing things a certain way for years. They know not to make assumptions that these customers have the same in-house capabilities and institutional knowledge that a non-industrial enterprise would—or, when it comes to software, that they even speak the same language. And they don’t assume that the customer will be willing to fill in gaps that are lost in translation. The most promising IIoT startups are ready to deliver IT solutions to industrial, and they’re not afraid to make it clear that that’s where their expertise lies. But they come out of the gate speaking OT.4.) They make security integrated.Successful IIoT startups know that treating security as an additional feature or up-sell will never fly. Their customers expect security to be baked into the product and fully integrated into existing industrial process.5.) They don’t try to eat the whole cake at once.Enterprise IT security and IIoT cybersecurity are two totally different animals. You can’t just port something from one world into the other. Yet, there are lessons to be learned from the evolution of enterprise security. Among the biggest that successful IIoT startups adhere to: they don’t try to solve the security problem in one fell swoop.In the enterprise world, we started with one big problem (protecting digital assets and data), and ultimately broke it down into a whole lot of smaller problems: perimeter security, identity/authentication, data loss prevention, compliance, etc. Smart IIoT startups apply the same thinking to IIoT cybersecurity. They’re not looking to “solve” industrial cybersecurity. They’re attacking smaller, discrete problems and developing useful solutions.6.) They start with the assumption that they will be targeted.Even the biggest and best digital companies in the world find malicious or unexplained code in their environments—sometimes threats that have been lying dormant for years. Smart IIoT startups expect that their solutions will be subject to the same types of malicious and/or intelligence gathering threats as well. That doesn’t mean they don’t spend a huge amount of time and effort trying to prevent breaches. But they spend just as much time and effort making sure that, if someone does get in, they can isolate that breach and prevent it from infiltrating the rest of the system. And they recognize that the ICS attack surface extends beyond industrial devices and networks themselves, to all parts of the organization and supply chain.7.) They’re ready to scale.Successful IIoT startups never forget that for industrial customers, zero downtime is acceptable. They know that it’s not enough to have great tech—they have to be ready to engage that technology on a scale of thousands of deployments, sometimes in multiple countries—sometimes overnight.8.) They know that security starts well before connecting a single industrial device.Successful IIoT startups recognize that some of the most dangerous vulnerabilities aren’t just flaws in their code, but weaknesses in their supply chain. They know that any OEM that incorporates subassemblies made by others can potentially introduce tampered firmware into their system by accident. And they’ve learned the lesson from vendors who had excellent technology but saw deals evaporate because the customer realized they were using an untrusted vendor for one component of the supply chain. Solid IIoT startups take steps to secure their products during every step from building to shipping, when it can be most vulnerable to mistakes or malicious actors.One of the more interesting areas now being explored: public ledgers. A growing number of companies are looking at Blockchain public ledger technologies to help authenticate assets and provide an audit trail with end-to-end chain of custody. (Industry groups are getting involved too—the Trusted IoT Alliance recently announced a new initiative to promote standard ledgers to authenticate IoT devices.) It’s still very early days, but work like this could prove incredibly valuable for ICS, where many categories of non-IT assets (engines, parts, sub-parts) are connecting back to the IT backbone.9.) They don’t get distracted by buzz words.The startup space, or at least the media covering it, tends to be overly sensitive to the hype cycle. Whatever the latest hot concept may be (currently, AI and machine learning), companies rush to make sure they can claim to check those boxes. Successful IIoT startups don’t spend their time worrying about the latest flavor of the month. They’re laser-focused on delivering concrete answers to specific industrial problems.10.) They understand the need to secure data at rest and in motion.Industrial customers need solutions not just to secure data at the edge—where more data than ever before is being collected and processed—but also to secure data in motion as it travels to the cloud.Data in motion poses a particularly cumbersome challenge for industrial systems. Some companies in this space are developing solutions to simplify passthrough of encrypted data, eliminating the need to decrypt data at any point in transit, and its associated risks.11.) They understand the job is never done.Good cybersecurity startups recognize that they’ll never be “finished” with their solution, and they don’t get too comfortable with their current design. They understand that real-world cybersecurity means ongoing, indefinite iteration.This isn’t a comprehensive list. But if you’re charting the course of companies developing interesting new solutions in IIoT cybersecurity, it’s a good place to start.Authors: Michael Dolbec & Abhishek Shukla, Managing Directors of GE Ventures Tags:#cybersecurity#ge ventures#IIoT#Industrial IoT#security#smart iot#tips Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Related Posts Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T…center_img AI: How it’s Impacting Surveillance Data Storage How Data Analytics Can Save Lives Michael Dolbec & Abhishek Shuklalast_img read more

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Preventing Heat From Going to Waste

By on December 3, 2019

first_imgFossil fuels power modern society by generating heat, but much of that heat is wasted. Researchers have tried to reclaim some of it with semiconductor devices called thermoelectrics, which convert the heat into power. But they remain too inefficient and expensive to be useful beyond a handful of niche applications.Now, scientists in Illinois report that they have used a cheap, well-known material to create the most heat-hungry thermoelectric so far. In the process, the researchers say, they learned valuable lessons that could push the materials to the efficiencies needed for widespread applications. If that happens, thermoelectrics could one day power cars and scavenge energy from myriad engines, boilers, and electrical plants.Thermoelectrics are slabs of semiconductor with a strange and useful property: heating them on one side generates an electric voltage that can be used to drive a current and power devices. To obtain that voltage, thermoelectrics must be good electrical conductors but poor conductors of heat, which saps the effect. Unfortunately, because a material’s electrical and heat conductivity tend to go hand in hand, it has proven difficult to create materials that have high thermoelectric efficiency—a property scientists represent with the symbol ZT.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Several years ago, researchers led by Mercouri Kanatzidis, a chemist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, discovered an impressive new thermoelectric material called lead telluride (PbTe), which had a ZT value of 2.2. That was reasonably close to the ZT of 3 that most researchers consider the minimum for widespread applications.Intrigued, Kanatzidis and his colleagues started testing PbTe’s chemical cousins. One was a shiny silver material called tin selenide (SnSe). Decades earlier, researchers had found that it was too poor an electrical conductor to be worth trying as a thermoelectric. But tin and lead belong to the same group in the periodic table, and tellurium and selenium both are members of another group. “It was a curiosity that we wanted to explore,” Kanatzidis says.So Kanatzidis and colleagues at Northwestern and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, decided to take another look at tin selenide. The researchers synthesized a bullet-sized sample of SnSe and cleaved pieces of it along three different orientations of the crystal’s atomic planes, known as the a-, b-, and c-axes—a standard technique for analyzing the properties of materials. They then charted the thermal and electrical conductivity of each sample across a wide temperature range. The b-axis sample turned out to have a better-than-expected electrical conductivity and a very low thermal conductivity to boot. Those properties gave the material a ZT of 2.6, the best value ever measured. The key to the ultralow thermal conductivity, Kanatzidis says, appears to be the pleated arrangement of tin and selenium atoms in the material, which looks like an accordion. The pattern seems to help the atoms flex when hit by heat-transmitting vibrations called phonons, thus dampening SbSe’s ability to conduct heat. The researchers report the results today in Nature.“I’m amazed,” says Joseph Heremans, a physicist at Ohio State University, Columbus, who wasn’t connected to the research. “This is a fantastic result for the field.” In addition to marking a big step toward thermoelectrics with a ZT of 3, Heremans says, the new material offers lessons on how to get there. Most likely, he says, researchers will try to boost the semiconductor’s electrical conductivity by spiking it with trace amounts of “dopant” atoms, while preserving the key accordionlike atomic arrangement. If anyone succeeds in producing a high-ZT material, Heremans says, it could lead to new, cheaper hybrid car engines in which the internal combustion engine doesn’t power the car, but rather generates heat that thermoelectric devices convert into electricity to power an electric motor. For now, that’s still a vision of the future. But it’s one that now appears closer than ever before.last_img read more

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