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News story: DASA Defence Logistics Hackathon

By on April 20, 2021

first_imgThe Defence Logistics hackathon will be taking place on 29-30 November 2018 in Central London.We are looking to bring together the best from academia, industry and government in the defence and security arena.This hackathon will focus on accelerating Logistics Decision Support through exploiting Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Machine Learning (ML) capabilities.The intent of this hackathon is to demonstrate the ability to analyse and share structured and unstructured multi-source data; maintaining its classification and permission based access rules at machine speed. Data sets from the C130J Hercules platform will be provided to enable the development and testing of potential sharing solutions. The longer-term aim will be the development of predictive maintenance tools, and provides evidence based recommendations to optimise inventory checks and extend the life of components.This event will require programmers and coders at the leading edge of current technology to develop an AI/ML capability that can be accessed, interrogated and translated to provide better informed and timely decision support across national and multinational domains.This event will provide a great opportunity to demonstrate your ability to solve current Defence Logistic challenges, as well as the opportunity to network with senior decision makers and end users within this area. Following the event you will be invited to submit a fully costed proposal which could lead to securing funding to further develop your product.To register for the event, please visit the Eventbrite page. Further information now available about this hackathon If you have any questions then please email [email protected] with the title Defence Logistics hackathon in the subject line.last_img read more

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Are you ready for Real Bread Week?

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first_imgReal Bread Week is fast approaching, and bakers, schools and communities around the world will be celebrating. If you haven’t planned your week already, now’s the time. The Real Bread Week theme for this year is ‘Doughing it for the kids’.Real Bread Week, (14-22 May), celebrates additive-free loaves and the people who make them. The focus this year is sharing the delicious delights of real bread with children.Tom Herbert of Hobbs House Bakery, campaign ambassador and Fabulous Baker Brother, said: “Real bread has the power to thrill taste buds and transform lives. Real Bread Week is the number one time of the year when bread-lovers go all out, showing off delicious loaves, and winning people over.”Balcony Shirts has created limited-edition On The Rise aprons and organic cotton t-shirts for the week, and are making a donation to the campaign for each one sold.For more details, go to: realbreadcampaign.orglast_img read more

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RedBlack signs deal with artificial intelligence start-up CatsAI

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first_imgRedBlack Software MD Jane Tyler and CatsAI founder and CEO Stephen KinnsCybake creator RedBlack Software has signed a partnership agreement with artificial intelligence start-up CatsAI.As of today (21 July), the Cybake bakery management system incorporates CatsAI technology. All Cybake subscribers, which include retail and wholesale bakeries of all types and sizes, now have the option to activate artificially intelligent sales predictions which it said can help increase revenue and reduce waste.The CatsAI technology uses 10,000 data points – including the weather, cultural events and school holidays – to predict how much of each product a bakery should produce on any given day. This is collected from EPoS data and the ‘brain’ does the rest.CatsAI was founded in 2018 by a four-strong team of analysts and AI experts. It first came to the attention of the Cybake team in October of that year after appearing in British Baker. At the time, it was seeking five bakeries to trial its system. Hertfordshire-based Dorringtons, Essex’s Mayfield Farm Bakery and Truffles Bakery in Sussex were among those to eventually take part.Cybake was already conducting AI research and development backed by the government’s Innovate UK department, so opened dialogue with CatsAI. In 2019, they agreed to proceed with an enhanced trial of the technology to test the accuracy and benefits of its predictions at a store level.“Having invested heavily in Cybake development in the last three years, we are leaders in forecasting not just for bakeries, but for supermarkets too. Because of this, it took a new, very compelling, approach to AI for us to even consider it,” said Jane Tyler, managing director of RedBlack Software.“CatsAI has precisely that approach and so I am very pleased that Cybake subscribers can now exploit its capabilities. The use of artificial intelligence in commercial baking is not something that is going to happen sometime in the future. Its time is now.”Stephen Kinns, CEO and co-founder of CatsAI, said the past 18 months had been extremely exciting for the start-up, adding that its technology is up to 80% more accurate than traditional methods.“AI compliments the baker’s decisions, enabling them to focus on baking,” he added.last_img read more

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Celebrate Eddie Vedder’s Birthday With Pearl Jam’s Classic MTV Unplugged Episode

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgToday, Pearl Jam’s iconic singer Eddie Vedder turns 53. For those who have been following the band for decades, this news seems almost unfathomable. Where did the time go?Fortunately for Pearl Jam fans, the band remains as vital as ever. Today, we can celebrate Vedder’s birthday the only way we know how, through his music. Check out this classic footage of the band performing on MTV’s Unplugged program in 1992, complete with performances of “Black,” “Alive,” “Jeremy,” and many more of the band’s live staples:Setlist: Pearl Jam on Unplugged 1992Oceans, State Of Love And Trust, Alive, Black, Jeremy, Even Flow, Porchlast_img read more

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They build, but modestly

By on March 1, 2021

first_imgAround 1980, two young architects finished their training in Bordeaux, France, and moved to Nigeria. In that African nation’s remote regions, they were inspired by the simple structures they saw amid the stark, stunning desert landscapes. The houses were open to the air, had utilitarian thatched roofs, and were made with bits of local wood. Modesty prevailed in structures that also invited beauty.The lessons of building in Africa stayed with Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal in their Paris-based practice, Lacaton & Vassal: use what is there, stay simple, embrace open air, and honor light, freedom, and grace. They practice social architecture based on economy, modesty, and the found beauty of environments.“Africa was probably our second school” after Bordeaux, said Vassal. While in Nigeria, they worked on town planning and traveled to marvel at indigenous building practices. “It [was] a fantastic liberty to live there.”Their belief in social architecture, shaded by a sense of African resourcefulness and economy, now embraces the overlooked utility and unseen loveliness of abandoned buildings, neglected public housing, rundown outdoor plazas, and overgrown urban forests that are at risk from a lack of imagination and coarse development.The architects brought their message to the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) in a picture-filled, poemlike evening lecture on March 24 in Gund Hall’s Piper Auditorium.Lacaton is a visiting design critic in architecture at the GSD. She is co-teaching a studio course this spring called “Re-Defining Urban Living.” (Her classroom partner is GSD instructor in architecture Marcos Rojo, a Spanish architect with an interest in the built environment of West Africa.)The course applies the Lacaton & Vassal architectural ethic even to battered urban settings growing denser and older. That ethic holds that design (and redesign) must emphasize the humanizing values of comfort, pleasure, well-being, economy, and modesty.Lacaton & Vassal’s designs champion “accuracy, sensitivity, kindness, and attention,” said Lacaton in opening remarks. Housing requires of an architect “the continuous attention to its inhabitant.”In a project called 23 Semi-Collective Housing Units in Trignac, France, Lacaton & Vassal constructed a series of light-filled loft duplexes topped by horticultural greenhouses. The same idea — a solid, simple grid of concrete and steel versatile and large enough to contain playful interiors — is at work in the firm’s Nantes School of Architecture. Its three-deck, lightweight, steel structure emphasizes flexible, generously sized interiors, transparent enough to show off views of the cityscape.Vassal called for buildings, like the one in Nantes, that have “porosity,” a striving to blend “what is inside and what is outside.”French architects Anne Lacaton (left), a visiting Graduate School of Design professor, and Jean-Philippe Vassal run the Paris-based design firm Lacaton & Vassal. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerAt play in these projects is another of the firm’s principles: build generous spaces at the lowest cost possible, with a sense of economy that does not surrender comfort and beauty. Spend the minimum, said Vassal, “to get the maximum.”Economy can also mean refurbishing what is already there. One of the more famous examples of this Lacaton & Vassal sustainability ethic is the firm’s 2002 reimagining of the Palais de Tokyo, a 1937 structure abandoned for decades, with 20,000 square meters of underused urban space, in Paris.The design called for doing “nearly nothing,” said Vassal. “Just the minimum for heating, for lighting.” (It’s a contemporary art space now, attracts 800,000 visitors a year, and was expanded in 2012.) The result illustrates the beauty of doing little, but cleverly, “to make sustainable,” he said, “what already exists.”In another project, FRAC Dunkerque, Lacaton & Vassal combined building the new with saving the old. Instead of tearing down an old boat warehouse in the port city of Dunkirk, France, they elected to build another just like it — of the same dimensions at least — right next to it.“Here inside was the energy,” said Vassal of the original structure’s grand old interior space, nostalgic yet useful. “Here inside was the work of the people.” (The double structure is now a gallery for contemporary art.)The same idea applies to another Lacaton & Vassal project. A cluster of urban social housing, 10-story buildings of 40 flats each was revived by adding balconies. They can be enclosed as heat-saving “winter gardens.” They are full of light, and are sensitive to local views. All this came, said Vassal, with a “budget much lower than demolition and reconstruction.”Similarly, in Bordeaux, Lacaton & Vassal is transforming a housing complex of 530 flats by adding prefabricated balconies, enlarging windows, and creating enclosed winter gardens. These are modest steps with dramatic results, and a renewed pleasure in personal space. Meanwhile, said Vassal, the eccentric character of each apartment is left alone. “All this is extremely charming,” he said of the interiors. “Why should we take this away?”Not taking things away includes preserving natural settings. “Innovate,” said Vassal, “but keep the site as it is.” The lecture’s many screened images included a house built on a dune within a seaside grove of trees. The construction — a light, high steel framework and windows for walls — did not disturb a single tree. There were “50 at the beginning of construction, 50 at the end,” he said. The idea was to be “extraordinarily precise” by inserting a house into a setting that already had “80 percent of what was needed,” said Vassal, including sand, trees, and a view.In the same way, Lacaton & Vassal designed an “ecological cluster neighborhood” on a tract of urban forest. To save each and every tree — and to allow more to grow — they proposed building housing units above the vegetation, on two levels. Interconnecting it all would be trail-like walkways, some of them elevated.Adding nature where there is none is sometimes the answer. In Bordeaux, the firm dramatically altered the look and feel of a pedestrian office building with one light clever touch: a vertical garden of 650 rose trees planted all around the façade.At other times, said Vassal, the solution to a design challenge is even more minimal, as with a small, tree-shaded urban plaza the firm had studied for months. The decision was “to do nothing,” he said. “Nothing.”Their simple ethic of building, said Vassal, “always starts from this little hut in Africa.”last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Jeremy Irvine Set for Buried Child & More

By on January 18, 2021

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Jeremy Irvine Set for West End’s Buried ChildScreen favorite Jeremy Irvine (Steven Spielberg’s War Horse, The Railway Man, Stonewall) will make his West End debut as Vince in Sam Shepard’s Buried Child. As previously reported, Ed Harris and Amy Madigan will reprise their performances from the New York production in the London transfer, which is set to play a limited engagement November 14 through February 18, 2017. Opening night is scheduled for December 1. Scott Elliott once again directs the New Group revival of the painfully funny family drama, which casts a brutal light on disenfranchised Americans.Comedy Central to Air Lewis Black’s Broadway ShowCan’t get to Broadway to see Lewis Black’s latest show? Never fear, Comedy Central will film his performance of Lewis Black: Black to the Future at the Marquis Theatre on September 26. The one-hour politically-themed special is slated to premiere on October 7.Davenport Theatre Switches It UpName change! After weeks of major renovations, the Davenport Theatre Black Box is now remodeled and renamed The Loft at the Davenport Theatre. The intimate off-Broadway space has a flexible seating capacity of up to 99. The first production scheduled to run at the renovated venue is A Dog Story, which begins previews on November 3.Joshua Henry Proves His Love for the 1980sWe’re loving Joshua Henry’s #HamJams from the Windy City. Check out the latest from the Chicago company of Hamilton showing the classic rock band Chicago some love. Next up, we expect a rendition of “All That Jazz!” Happy Flashback Friday! Jeremy Irvine(Photo: Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images) P.S. Slight date switcheroo for the buzzy La La Land, starring Broadway alum Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling; the film will now debut in limited theaters on December 9 (instead of December 2). Wide release is still planned for December 16, Deadline writes.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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Neil Patrick Harris to Produce New York Premiere of In & Of Itself

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first_img Related Shows In & Of Itself, a new magic-storytelling hybrid show created by and starring Derek DelGaudio, will head off-Broadway this spring. Tony-winning magic enthusiast Neil Patrick Harris will produce the New York premiere, which is directed by Emmy winner Frank Oz. The 10-week limited engagement will begin on April 5 at the Daryl Roth Theatre.The show premiered at Los Angles’ Geffen Playhouse last year. It explores the illusion of self-identity as it weaves memories and secrets of the past, present and future.Harris, a Tony winner for Hedwig and the Angry Inch, previously directed DelGaudio in the off-Broadway magic show Nothing to Hide.In & Of Itself will open officially on April 12 and is scheduled to run through June 18. The production is designed by A. Bandit and features original music by Devo frontman Mark Mothersbaugh. Derek DelGaudio in ‘In & Of Itself’ at Geffen Playhouse(Photo: Jeff Lorch) In & Of Itselfcenter_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 19, 2017last_img read more

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South Australia launches sweeping residential energy storage program

By on December 31, 2020

first_imgSouth Australia launches sweeping residential energy storage program FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:South Australia’s Liberal government officially opened the country’s biggest support scheme for household battery storage, with up to 40,000 homes able to access grants and low-interest finance for both battery storage and new rooftop solar installations.The $200 million scheme – half in grants and the other half in loans provided by the Clean Energy Finance Corporation – delivers on a pre-election promise from the newly elected Marshall government, but is heavily modified after the then Labor government proposed a similar scheme, but with more focus on low-income housing and more connection between installations.South Australia – as most people are aware – is leading the country and possible the world in terms of penetration of wind and solar, with more than 50 per cent of its generation coming from these variable resources, and the Australian Energy Market Operator predicts that share could rise to near 100 per cent by 2025.While much of the focus has been on the state’s large-scale renewable investments, the state also boasts the highest penetration of rooftop solar, with more than 930MW, and this is starting to have an impact on the way the grid is managed. Rooftop solar is now providing up to 45 per cent of generation at certain times of the day, and the growing amounts of solar could push that grid demand to zero in coming years, causing AEMO to look for ways to try and “orchestrate” this resource for the overall benefit of the grid.The scheme could add up to 400MWh of storage to the grid – not quite four times the size of the 100MW/129MWh Tesla big battery next to the Hornsdale wind farm that has dominated interest from operators and market players – and this could time shift the output of solar, and provide essential grid services.More: South Australia opens biggest household battery storage support schemelast_img read more

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What happens in Vegas, gets posted to CUInsight

By on December 18, 2020

first_imgAside from the 7 straight days of temperatures exceeding 105, my family’s vacation to Las Vegas in early June was rather pleasant. But it did not start off too well and I experienced first hand how brand experience can go south very quickly.After a May business trip and a great experience at the Aria Hotel and Casino, I decided it would be a fun experience for my family. With just a couple of calls and some web searches, I found the best package via Priceline and booked two rooms at the Aria. I had high expectations and bragged to my wife and kids about how great the hotel was.Upon arrival, the four of us headed to the check-in desk, expecting a quick, uneventful check in experience. Unfortunately, we had no such luck. It took 20 minutes to check in once we began speaking with the check in person. It seemed that they could not find two adjoining rooms, even though they knew I requested two rooms, they knew we were a family and they knew we have two teenagers. After some running around and a lengthy conversation between the check in person and her supervisor, we were given our door cards to rooms on the 24th floor. In addition to taking 20 minutes to check-in, not apologizing for the wait and not acknowledging that I was just there 5 weeks ago, it was an instant disappointment and a let down. Strike one. Surely, things would be better as we entered our opulent, deluxe, adjoining rooms.The elevator ride was without a hitch. After-all, what could go wrong with an elevator? Once the doors opened on 24th floor, we were hit with a very strong smell that smelled like glue or epoxy. It turns out, part of the 24th floor was being remodeled with new wall coverings being affixed. Onward we went, towards the other end of the hallway thinking the smell would not be too bad. As we continued down the hall, the smell seemed to fade away. Thank goodness, because I really built up the expectation of the Aria with my family.A few minutes later we arrived at our rooms. They were next to each other, but not adjoining as we had requested. Strike 2. The kids went to theirs and we entered ours. I went right to the view (which was excellent) and my wife went right to the bathroom. That’s when things got rather ugly. On the bathroom floor lay a used, dirty towel. Another was on the shower floor with the shower completely wet. Above the toilet was an open compartment for access to the plumbing. Strike 3! What the heck is going on? Within a moment my wife went over to the kids room and noted a dirty, wet towel in their shower and a partially removed tile by the toilet. It was at this time that my wife darted to the phone and called guest services to let them know that our rooms were unexpectable. While on the phone, she noticed popcorn under our bed. Strike 4. My recommendation of the Aria was starting to backfire quickly.Housekeeping came up to the rooms rather quickly. They too seemed surprised by the condition of the rooms and stated “these rooms should never have been released.” They even photographed “the scene” to report it back to management. It felt more like a scene from CSI Las Vegas, than a nice start to a vacation in a luxury hotel. Ernesto, the housekeeping supervisor assured me that the Aria would “make this right” and likely put us up in some Sky Suites.After some back and forth on the phone, it was decided a personal visit to guest services was the way to go. So down 24 floors we went. Guest services informed us that they would have new rooms available the next day and that they would call us as soon as they were ready. In the meantime, they would thoroughly clean our rooms on floor 24, which they did promptly. We were also given a $50 credit per room. So no unpacking for the night, but we were ok with this, thinking they would take care of us the next day after we enjoyed spending our $100 on the buffet breakfast.By mid-afternoon the next day, we grew tired of waiting for a call regarding the status of our new rooms. If you’re counting, that’s strike 5. Off to guest services we went, yet again. Only one of the two rooms were available, but we could move into it and await for room number two. Strike 6. We were not happy that it was up to us to follow-up with guest services after that promised to notify us of our room availability. We vented and it was agreed that we’d get 2 nights resort fees credited to each room. There was no suggestion that a valet could assist us with the move, so off to the 30th floor we went, with our luggage in tow; to get the 30th floor, we had to go back down to the casino level first, then up another elevator to the 30th floor. As for Ernesto’s suggestion we’d end up in Sky Suites, no such luck, although he led us to believe we would. Strike 7.So what’s my point? Don’t stay at the Aria? No, it’s a great place to stay. For whatever reason, there were several breakdowns in communication and maybe some behind the scene blaming. Nobody on the hotel staff owned our experience, and that was a disappointment.Do you own your member’s experience at your credit union? 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bryan Clagett Bryan is on the executive team and singularly focused on driving revenue growth through a variety of new initiatives that help financial services and fintech become ever more relevant to … Web: https://www.strategycorps.com Detailslast_img read more

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Global coronavirus deaths exceed 700,000, one person dies every 15 seconds on average

By on October 19, 2020

first_imgTopics : The global death toll from the coronavirus surpassed 700,000 on Wednesday, according to a Reuters tally, with the United States, Brazil, India and Mexico leading the rise in fatalities.Nearly 5,900 people are dying every 24 hours from COVID-19 on average, according to Reuters calculations based on data from the past two weeks.That equates to 247 people per hour, or one person every 15 seconds. President Donald Trump said the coronavirus outbreak is as under control as it can get in the United States, where more than 155,000 people have died amid a patchy response to the public health crisis that has failed to stem a rise in cases.”They are dying, that’s true,” Trump said in an interview with the Axios news website. “It is what it is. But that doesn’t mean we aren’t doing everything we can. It’s under control as much as you can control it. This is a horrible plague.”In Brazil, President Jair Bolsonaro has minimized the gravity of the pandemic and opposed lockdown measures, even as he and several of his cabinet tested positive for the virus.The pandemic was initially slower to reach Latin America, which is home to about 640 million people, than much of the world. But officials have since struggled to control its spread because of the region’s poverty and densely packed cities.center_img More than 100 million people across Latin America and the Caribbean live in slums, according to the United Nations Human Settlements Program. Many have jobs in the informal sector with little in the way of a social safety net and have continued to work throughout the pandemic.Even in parts of the world that had appeared to have curbed the spread of the virus, countries have recently seen single-day records in new cases, signaling the battle is far from over.Australia, Japan, Hong Kong, Bolivia, Sudan, Ethiopia, Bulgaria, Belgium, Uzbekistan and Israel all recently had record increases in cases.Australia also reported a record number of new deaths on Wednesday, taking the country’s total to 247.last_img read more

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