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Firkin battles back with store revamp

By on April 21, 2021

first_imgTroubled Birmingham bakery chain Firkin is getting a new lease of life after facing collapse earlier this year.One of its 53 shops – in Corporation Street – has had a £50,000 revamp, while the rest of the portfolio will get the bright new look as part of owner Ian Bolderston’s plans to transform its outdated image and make it competitive in the marketplace again.Bolderston, who owns the West Midlands’ Wollaston Bakery, bought 136-year-old family firm Firkin out of administration in January when it blamed strong competition in the bakery market from superstores and out-of-town shopping centres for the downturn in its fortunes.”We are completely revamping the image of Firkin. The company itself is steeped in history so we certainly don’t want to lose sight of that,” said Bolderston. “The name is well known and fondly thought of by loyal customers so we have kept the name and brought it up to date.”Each of the stores, based in Birmingham and around the Black Country, will be installed with ovens and equipment so that products can be prepared on site. They are normally made at Firkin’s central bakery in Black Lake.Product lines are being developed to offer more choice, including a range of paninis and sandwiches. Ranges will be tailored to suit the demographic of each location. Another store will get the new look in a few months time.last_img read more

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Governor Holcomb officially extends Stay-At-Home order

By on April 20, 2021

first_img Google+ Google+ CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Twitter Governor Holcomb officially extends Stay-At-Home order Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter By 95.3 MNC – April 20, 2020 1 431 Pinterest (Photo supplied/State of Indiana) As expected, Governor Eric Holcomb has issued a revised Stay At Home order that lasts through May 1 and is designed to limit interactions among Hoosiers to increase containment of COVID-19.As of Monday, April 20, 11,686 people have tested positive and 569 people have died from the disease in Indiana. There are now positive tests in 92 of 92 counties.As a part of this action, Gov. Holcomb also extended through May 1 the orders that limit in-person public activity at state government offices and put restrictions on the operation of restaurants, bars and nightclubs.While the Stay At Home order chiefly continues as is, EO 20-22 brings clarity to some essential businesses.As long as sufficient personal protective equipment (PPE), staff and other supplies are available for the COVID-19 response, hospitals should conduct medically necessary procedures, such as those determining cancer diagnosis and cardiac issues, respiratory procedures, and procedures to reduce significant pain or symptoms making quality of life unacceptable.Any restrictions involving medical procedures will be evaluated every seven days for appropriate and timely modifications that could be implemented.Permitted outdoor activity as described in the executive order includes yard work, gardening, planting and landscaping at residential, commercial and industrial properties and farms.Nurseries and garden centers may be open for business as long as they limit the number of customers in their facility at any given time to achieve the Centers for Disease Control’s required social distancing, limit their hours of operation and consider implementing separate operating hours for the elderly and other vulnerable customers, and comply with the social distancing, sanitation and other mitigation measure to protect its employees and the public.Pet grooming at a pet salon, store or mobile unit is permitted.The Critical Industries Hotline continues to be available from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday to respond to business and industry questions about whether a business is considered essential. The center may be reached by calling 877-820-0890 or by emailing [email protected] to frequently asked questions and instructions to file for COVID-19-related unemployment are available at Unemployment.IN.gov.A link to the updated Stay-At-Home Order FAQ may be found here: https://www.in.gov/gov/3232.htm Pinterest Facebook Previous articleCoronavirus sickens Indiana mayor’s wife, kills her motherNext articleSBFD offering virtual tours of their environmentally-friendly stations on Earth Day 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan.last_img read more

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Legislators may tighten mask enforcement at Indiana Statehouse

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first_img Pinterest By Network Indiana – January 17, 2021 0 233 Twitter Pinterest Facebook Google+ IndianaLocalNews (Photo supplied/State Of Indiana) Legislators may tighten enforcement of mask requirements at the Indiana Statehouse:Lawmakers aren’t required to wear masks, though nearly all of them do. But masks are required for anyone else at the statehouse. Several people planning to testify at a Wednesday committee hearing ignored that order. Senate President Pro Tem Rod Bray (R-Martinsville) says legislators are talking to Capitol police about enforcing the requirement.As a coronavirus precaution, most committee hearings this year have legislators gathered in one room while witnesses and spectators are in another. Some people who had planned to testify at Wednesday’s hearing left rather than share the room with those defying the mask mandate. Bray and House Speaker Todd Huston (R-Fishers) says people who come to the statehouse need to feel safe there. Bray says the legislative staffers or interns who have been assigned to the witness rooms aren’t in a position to tell people to mask up.It’s not clear what Capitol police would do to enforce the order. Bray says he’d rather avoid kicking people out of the building. He says he hopes a firm reminder from a uniformed officer will get people to follow the mandate. And Bray says officers can also restore proper decorum at hearings. He says with the meeting split between two rooms, many of the unmasked activists who disagreed with someone’s testimony were talking back to the video feed and creating an unruly atmosphere.Legislators were debating a bill barring employers from requiring workers to get the coronavirus vaccine. Bray says the bill’s opponents may have undermined their cause — he says a vote on the bill was delayed because of the number of people who left without testifying. Legislators may tighten mask enforcement at Indiana Statehouse Previous articleIU Prof: Health , economic success go hand-in-hand in Hoosier stateNext articleBill would allow schools to access expunged criminal records of potential employees Network Indiana WhatsApp Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

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U2 To Tour Stadiums, Headline Bonnaroo For “Joshua Tree” 30th Anniversary [Report]

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgIf all goes to plan, U2 fans are in for a great year in 2017. According to sources at Billboard, the famed rockers have some major tour dates in the works for next year, as part of a major year-long 30th anniversary celebration of their renowned 1987 release, The Joshua Tree. The report indicates that U2 will be hitting stadiums as well as Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival as part of these plans.Though the dates have yet to be confirmed, some details have emerged from source reports. Two shows of the tour will be at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, NJ, and the headlining set at Bonnaroo has long been rumored among the festival’s fanbase. The rest remains unreported, though will probably see U2 traverse most of America and Europe for the celebration.The band did release a Merry Christmas video, which supports all of these reports into U2’s future plans. The video also confirms that the band has a new album due out in 2017 as well, though the release remains untitled. Watch below.last_img read more

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PREMIERE: Watch Little Silver’s New-Retro Music Video For “One Stepper” Off New Album

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first_imgBased in Brooklyn, Little Silver is a contemporary rock duo built around the ethereal vocals of husband and wife, Steve Curtis and Erika Simonian. With the addition of drummer Ray Rizzo and David Tarica on bass, Little Silver’s sound has fully come into its own. Underlying the group is a tendency toward thoughtfulness and simplicity, with many of its songs characterized by contemplative lyrics and a beautiful and understated musical depth.The couple met as touring musicians living in New York City—Curtis as a member of the contemporary folk group Hem, and Simonian as a part of various rock bands. After a whirlwind romance, the two married, then formed Little Silver in 2010, with the project allowing Simonian to capitalize on her softer musical sensibilities while letting Curtis let loose musically.Today, the group debuts a brand-new music video for the number, “One Stepper”, off Little Silver’s recently released album, Somewhere You Found My Name. As told by the band, “‘One Stepper’ is about, pretty plainly, addiction—and the pain and frustration of loving someone who is essentially unreachable. Though the energy of the song is upbeat and fun (and we love that about it), it’s also a reflection of the punch and smiling-through-clenched-teeth that you need to get through.”The music video—created by Alexis Fleisig (Girls Against Boys, The Obits)—plays off the band’s timeless vibe, with the throwback stylings of the video further augmenting the nostalgic, if not bittersweet, nature of the song. Live For Live Music is happy to premiere the brand new retro-stylized music video for Little Silver’s “One Stepper” off their 2017 debut, Somewhere You Found My Name. Check it out below:Watch the brand new video for Little Silver’s “One Stepper” below via the band’s YouTube page:For more information on Little Silver and their upcoming projects, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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ND architecture graduate designs venue for papal visit

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgJust weeks before receiving his master’s degree from the Notre Dame School of Architecture earlier this year, James Lenahan learned he had won the Papal Sanctuary Design Contest, a competition held by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to design the sanctuary in which Pope Francis will celebrate Mass during his first visit to the United States later this month.Lenahan’s submission — only recently announced to the public as the winning entry — will inspire the final design of the sanctuary to be constructed in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the closing Mass of the eighth World Meeting of Families on Sept. 27.“It was just an incredible honor to have been selected and a really amazing thing for [me], as a student at the time, to contribute to this incredible, historic event,” Lenahan said.Lenahan said he specifically tailored his design to reflect the mission of the World Meeting of Families, which according to a press release by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is “to strengthen the sacred bonds of family across the globe and highlight its intrinsic value to the good of society.”There were relatively few contest requirements, and the majority of the regulations concerned the physical dimensions of the sanctuary and the inclusion of elements such as an altar, the pope’s chair, a lectern and an ambo. Thus, Lenahan said he had considerable freedom to experiment with ideas for his design.“It was a little bit of a challenge because we had ideas of what was required for the competition, but other than the basic elements, it was kind of open-ended in terms of what they might be looking for,” he said. “In some sense, in design that can be challenging, just in terms of having a completely blank slate.”Receiving little guidance from the competition itself, Lenahan said he turned to previous examples of large Papal Masses — such as Pope John Paul II’s 1979 Mass in Chicago — for inspiration. He said his ultimate goal was to create “something that would be harmonious with what the site was, the shape of the site.”Taking into account a variety of practical considerations – foremost among these the estimated crowd size of 1.5 million – Lenahan said he eventually decided to elevate the sanctuary in order to make it more visible.He also said he settled upon a traditional style for his design, in keeping with the classical façade of the Philadelphia Museum of Art which will provide the backdrop for the Mass.“The classical has a great deal of beauty that can enlighten the sense of the sacred to a Mass even when it’s an outdoor setting,” he said.According to Samantha Salden, assistant dean of the graduate programs in the School of Architecture, Lenahan’s implementation of a classical design was particularly fitting because of the Notre Dame architecture program’s emphasis on classical and traditional architecture.Salden, who also served as Lenahan’s graduate advisor, said Lenahan came to Notre Dame “eager to expand his understanding of classical architecture.”“[He] felt a passion for tradition and for doing good things for communities, whether that be within an institution or a neighborhood or a broader community,” Salden said. “He is a very unassuming person, very quiet, but very talented.”In addition to the prize money associated with the award, Salden said Lenahan will receive countless benefits from winning the contest.“It’s quite prestigious,” she said. “The fact that it is going to have an international audience, not just a national audience, with an event of this scale is hugely gratifying for Jim and will serve him well for years to come.”And beyond its personal impact on Lenahan, Salden said the award is significant because it highlights the ability of architectural design to alter people’s perceptions.“Architecture is a vibrant and important part of our everyday experience,” she said. “What we do is not just about putting up structures that are expressive of ourselves personally, but to be a great architect you have to be able to respond to the community that is using this structure, this building.”Like Salden, Lenahan said he recognized the award to be a formative milestone in his career as an architect.“It was a great opportunity that was offered based on my studies at Notre Dame, and I feel fortunate that I had some of the tools through studying there that allowed me to participate,” Lenahan said.“It is incredibly humbling and I just hope that [my design] will be a successful setting for this event.”Tags: James Lenahan, Pope Francis, Samantha Salden, School of Architecturelast_img read more

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Great grain

By on January 17, 2021

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaSay “sorghum” in many parts of Georgia, and the topic may turn to the values of sorghum syrup. Wait a few years, though, and that same biscuit-topper may be the center of a biofuels discussion.Like many crops, grain sorghum has trouble thriving in Georgia’s typically humid climate. But both statewide and nationwide, its worth is growing.”At the moment, sorghum is the No. 2 bioethanol crop in the country,” said University of Georgia scientist Andrew Paterson. “Bioethanol is currently produced from seeds. There are a number of reasons why we’d want to use the whole plant.”With a farm-sales value of $3.2 million, sorghum ranked No. 56 among Georgia crops in 2005, between apples and okra. As a seed-based ethanol crop, sorghum falls right below corn. “Grain sorghum is a good substitute for corn,” said agricultural economist John McKissick, director of the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. The center is studying the feasibility of growing sorghum and other crops for biofuel in Georgia.What sets sorghum apart as a prospective whole-plant-based ethanol crop is that sorghum can easily be made perennial. Coming back year after year, perennials aren’t as prone as annuals to causing erosion, Paterson said.Sorghum efficiently converts the sun’s light into energy and needs only about half the water of corn. That makes it a prime candidate for further ethanol studies.”It can easily make the transition from seed-based to whole-plant-based biofuels,” Paterson said.This transition has already happened with sorghum’s cousin, sugarcane, which is grown in the U.S.’s tropical climates. Sugarcane is the No. 1 ethanol-producing crop worldwide, he said.When it comes to sorghum, Paterson’s research focuses deeply on the plant itself, not necessarily its by-products: food, feed, ethanol and alcoholic beverages.Paterson has spent 15 years studying sorghum’s genetic blueprint. He’s hoping now to find answers: Why is the plant more drought-resistant than corn? How did it get its genetic makeup? What genes give certain plants height and others disease resistance?”First we built a genetic map of sorghum,” Paterson said. “It’s kind of like the mileposts on a highway. We had the mileposts but not the asphalt between them. There was still a lot we didn’t know.”Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy completed the sequencing of sorghum at its Joint Genome Institute, collaborating with Paterson’s lab and several others.”It’s a huge advance,” he said of the JGI’s work. “It’s happened much more quickly than we expected.”Paterson, a distinguished research professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ crop and soil science department, is also director of the UGA Plant Genome Mapping Laboratory (www.plantgenome.uga.edu).And now, thanks to a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, he can examine sorghum’s 740 million bases, or letters, more thoroughly. At 740 million letters of DNA, sorghum has a genetic code roughly a quarter the size of the human genome.Guggenheim Fellows are appointed for their distinguished achievement and exceptional promise and receive a grant to use in their research.”I think the most interesting outcome of this work,” Paterson said of the fellowship, “is that for the first time, we’ll have a picture of diversity among the cereals. Years ago, they sequenced the rice genome, and it was the only one for a while. Sorghum and rice are quite different.”Through computer models, he’ll be able to deduce what the sorghum gene set looks like. And he can build hypotheses on why sorghum has certain traits such as height, flowering and disease resistance that can be tested in the field. “Sorghum is important now as a promising biomass,” Paterson said. As the demand for biofuels increases, understanding the plant’s building blocks grows in importance, especially as scientists look at moving from seed-based to plant-based biofuels.last_img read more

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Central Vermont Public Service Corp declares common and preferred stock dividends

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgOn February 14, 2011 the Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (NYSE: CV) Board of Directors approved the following resolution: That out of reserved and unrestricted earnings of the Company a quarterly dividend at the rate of twenty-three cents ($.23) per share is hereby declared on the issued and outstanding shares of Common Stock, $6 Par Value, payable May 13, 2011 to stockholders of record at the close of business May 3, 2011.Also, the board approved that out of the reserved and unrestricted retained earnings of the Company quarterly dividends on the Preferred Stock, $100 Par Value, of $1.04 per share on the 4.15% Dividend Series, $1.16 per share on the 4.65% Dividend Series, $1.18 per share on the 4.75% Dividend Series, and $1.34375 per share on the 5.375% Dividend Series, are hereby declared payable April 1, 2011 to stockholders of record at the close of business March 22, 2011. RUTLAND, VT–(Marketwire – February 14, 2011) –last_img read more

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NAFCU Board, Cordray talk reg concerns, burdens

By on December 17, 2020

first_img continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Various regulatory issues affecting the credit union industry, including overdraft, the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) and unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts or practices (UDAAP), were discussed Tuesday by the NAFCU Board and CFPB Director Richard Cordray at NAFCU’s headquarters.“NAFCU and its board thank Director Cordray for his willingness to listen to our concerns and the regulatory issues impacting credit unions,” said NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger. “Despite the industry showing signs of growth in the past year, heavy regulation continues to take its toll. NAFCU will remain in close contact with the bureau, encouraging use of its existing exemption authority so credit unions can continue to deliver exceptional service to their 110 million members.”Tuesday’s meeting included a discussion of credit unions’ regulatory burden and how the CFPB can better use its exemption authority for the industry. The NAFCU Board strongly urged the bureau to avoid promulgating any rule that would put any credit union offerings in jeopardy or that would curtail service to their members. The NAFCU Board also pushed for more clarification – through the use of guidance – on the bureau’s approach to UDAAP.last_img read more

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20 ways you can stay safe this Independence Day

By on December 8, 2020

first_img(WBNG) — The American Red Cross is offering advice on how you can stay safe this 4th of July. Grilling Safety Never give fireworks to small children or throw a firework toward people, animals, vehicles or structuresKeep a supply of water nearbyUse eye protection when lightning a fireworkLight one firework at a time and never relight a “dud”Store fireworks in a dry, cool place Water Safety Maintain a distance of six-feet, especially if you’re at risk for serious illnessWear face coverings in publicAvoid large crowds and mass gatheringsClean and disinfect surfaces regularlyStay home if you’re sick Here are 20 COVID-19 and traditional Independence Day safety tips provided by the Red Cross:center_img COVID-19 Safety Talk to your children about water safetySwim in places designated for swimmingDo not wear COVID-19 protective gear in the waterDesignated one person to a “water watcher” who supervises people in water-related activityDrain kiddie and inflatable pools once you’re done swimming Fireworks Safety Supervise all grills and don’t add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignitedNever grill indoors or inside anythingEnsure everyone stays away from the grill including pets and childrenKeep the grill away from anything that can catch fireUse long handed tools made for cooking on the grilllast_img read more

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