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News story: CT Summer Security

By on April 20, 2021

first_imgSpecialist advice for companies operating in crowded places, split into different sectors such as major events, sport stadia, visitor attractions, bars, theatres and shopping centres, is still available on the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NACTSO) website.Key advice for anyone attending an event this summer Withdrawn by NaCTSO,As the UK prepares to kick off the summer months with a busy May Bank Holiday weekend filled with festivals, concerts and sporting events; police security experts will again be working in partnership with event organisers to ensure that safety and security remains top of the agenda.Launched for the first time last year in response to the terror attacks in both London and Manchester, ‘Summer Security’ has already delivered advice, best practice and training to thousands of festival workers, staff and security guards across the UK.This year, experts from Counter Terrorism Policing will once again be working in partnership with organisers at major entertainment and sporting venues up and down the country to ensure that thousands more staff will be able to minimise the chance of attacks and mitigate the impact they can have.While there is no intelligence to indicate an increased threat to summer events, the new National Coordinator for Protect and Prepare Policing, T/Chief Superintendent Nick Aldworth, wants the public to familiarise themselves with the existing safety information so they too, can play a part in the UK’s collective security.T/Chief Superintendent Aldworth said: You can follow and support the campaign at @terrorismpolice using #ActionCountersTerrorism. Summer Security is all about making sure people can enjoy themselves safe in the knowledge that the staff around them are trained to know what to do should the worst happen. Sadly we have seen that these big public events and crowded spaces can be targeted by those who want to cause harm, but I want to reassure the public that the police, partners and the event organisers are doing all we can to keep them safe and secure. You can help make these events safer by reading our Run, Hide, Tell advice, and to be ready to ACT if you spot suspicious behaviour and activity. Don’t think you might be wasting our time, it is always better to be safe than sorry. If something doesn’t look or feel right, tell someone. Please arrive early for extra security measures. This will help prevent delays in getting into the event. Be patient with security checks and help the staff to help you. We know it is inconvenient but they are there to keep you safe. It is essential that you do not bring unnecessary items to the event; this will help to speed up searches and your entry to the event. If you spot someone acting suspiciously, report it to police or to security staff immediately: don’t leave it to someone else. #ActionCountersTerrorism In an emergency, if you think there is an immediate risk, always call 999 and look around you for help from staff – especially those with radios who can raise the alarm quickly. Don’t leave bags unattended or anywhere they could cause a security scare. And never agree to look after anyone else’s bags, no matter how plausible their story. If there is an incident, listen to staff and any announcements. Organisers will have emergency plans to help you keep safe. Remember, the chance of being caught in a terrorism incident is small. But if it happens – Run, Hide, Tell gov.uk/ACTlast_img read more

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Phil Lesh Announces Tribute To Grateful Dead 1994 At Terrapin Crossroads

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgLast year marked the 50th anniversary of the Grateful Dead. To celebrate the band’s legendary status, Phil Lesh started hosting a series of shows at his Terrapin Crossroads to honor each of the years that the Dead were in motion.On October 17, the series continues at the San Rafael venue with a tribute to Grateful Dead’s 1994 persona. The Grateful Dead bassist will be joined by guitarists Grahame Lesh and Stu Allen, keyboardist Scott Guberman, and drummers Ezra Lipp and Alex Koford. Tickets are currently available for the show here.The venue’s post below describes the magic that took place in 1994, the year that the band members were officially inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “It was a moment in time where the band was able to reflect on the wonderful journey they had been on since their inception in 1965, and thank the Deadheads who stood by them all those years,” the post explains. It was also the last year of touring before the band lost their leader Jerry Garcia. Read more below:last_img read more

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A safer return to campuses? There’s an app for that

By on March 1, 2021

first_img Finding COVID clues in movement Tracking mobility of individuals offers hints of whether a problem is rising or falling Fauci says herd immunity possible by fall, ‘normality’ by end of 2021 Colleges and universities are confronting a pressing question: How do they safely bring students back to campus amid a surging, world-wide pandemic? The decision involves careful consideration of a range of factors, from shared housing to testing capabilities to the likelihood of asymptomatic spread among students and staff. With death rates climbing to devastating levels and more contagious variants of the virus emerging, that choice has become even more consequential.To help inform some of those decisions, a team of Harvard researchers that includes Gary King, the director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS), and Rochelle Walensky, the incoming director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have launched a new disease-modeling app that simulates what different transmission and mitigation scenarios can look like in university settings.Called COVIDU, the app is an interactive tool that factors several important conditions  — community transmission, external infection, testing cadence, student population, and other social settings unique to campus communities — in modeling the spread of COVID-19 on a hypothetical campus and estimating the likelihood of different potential outcomes.The easy-to-use tool allows users to fully customize the range of conditions on which the system bases its calculations. This helps to better mimic the users’ own campus community. It also considers the behavior of students and potential visitors, including how many might flout rules and attend social gatherings. The app even models super-spreader events and their fallout. “The app essentially creates hypothetical people that would mirror what actually happens in the real world as closely as possible.” — Gary King Related “It models how often do students interact with each other? How often might they just not follow exactly the public health recommendations? How often will we have a visitor from somewhere else that maybe shouldn’t be there? How often may somebody who’s helping undergraduates [like a staff member] come on campus with the disease and spread it to somebody else?” said King, the Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor. “The app essentially creates hypothetical people that would mirror what actually happens in the real world as closely as possible.”The app can also account for different epidemiological conditions in its predictions, like a surge in infections in the surrounding area or more aggressive mutations of the virus. For instance, Harvard administrators used the system recently to model how the new U.K. variant could impact the campus community.The idea for the app came from the modeling work done by Harvard’s evidence-based decision-making subcommittee over the summer. Along with King and Walensky, who’s also chief of Massachusetts General Hospital’s Division of Infectious Diseases and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, the group included Christopher Avery, the Roy E. Larsen Professor of Public Policy at HKS; James Stock, the Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences; and David Paltiel, professor of public health at Yale University.Last summer, the subcommittee was tasked with amassing evidence and doing modeling and statistical analyses to inform decisions about bringing Harvard’s students back to campus for the fall and spring semesters. Working with IQSS, the group designed a system that combined classic epidemiological modeling with on-campus dynamics like shared housing, transmission rates in the surrounding community, student interactions, and a mass testing and isolation system. The system built on a similar COVID model for campuses that Walensky and Paltiel helped create earlier in the summer.The researchers modeled the Harvard community with the new system and used it to come up with a recommendation for how many students could be brought back to campus and to decide the right level of testing to keep the community safe.The COVIDU app expands that model and generalizes it so that other universities and organizations can use it. “You can set the parameters to reflect whatever conditions are appropriate to your campus or other campus-like environments, and then you can run the app and it’ll make any predictions from there,” said Zagreb Mukerjee, a research data scientist at the IQSS who helped design the system.center_img What crowdsourced big data may be able to tell us about COVID Experts detail vaccine unknowns, need to continue masking, distancing Health information self-reported by app fuels infection prediction model Users can also generate reports with graphs and tables on the scenarios they model and ones comparing different circumstances and consequences. The researchers hope the app will help improve understanding of COVID-19 transmission and mitigation strategies on college campuses, even among those without a background in modeling or epidemiology.“By putting this out there, we’re hoping to get feedback from other scientists so that the underlying science can get better through collaboration. Of course, we also hope other campuses will benefit as well,” Mukerjee said.last_img read more

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Roots & sidewalks

By on January 17, 2021

first_imgBy Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaGrowing trees in parking lots and around sidewalks can be tricky.Developers save trees only to have the roots break up sidewalks afew years later. A University of Georgia training program hasbeen set up to save the trees and the sidewalks.The UGA Extension Service is using a $20,000 Georgia UrbanForestry Council grant to train county extension agents inGeorgia’s urban counties.”This grant has allowed us to develop a train-the-trainer programto deliver urban forestry educational material,” said SheldonHammond, the Northwest Extension District program developmentcoordinator for the UGA College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences. Agents will train in their countiesThe train-the-trainer program is designed to teach county agents,who then train people in their counties. The program was set upthrough the UGA Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture in Griffin,Ga.”Our goal is to train 40 urban county agents,” Hammond said.”This will lead to 400 Master Gardener volunteers being trainedwith advanced tree education that they can take to the public.”Urban county agents include those in Atlanta, Athens, Savannah,Valdosta, Macon, LaGrange, Augusta and other urban areasstatewide.Hammond said these county agents are answering more and morequestions related to urban forestry.”They help people manage green space in urban areas, deal withtrees in construction areas and asphalt parking lots,” he said.”Managing trees in urban environments is a whole new dynamic.”Urban county agents also train homeowners on how to properly growand maintain trees in urban settings. Correcting poor practicesHammond hopes the statewide urban forestry training will helpdispel some misunderstandings.”There’s a lot of misinformation out there, especially in thearea of pruning,” he said. “People are using truly poor pruningpractices, and the trees are suffering as a result.”Many people don’t understand the nature of a tree’s root system,Hammond said.”We constantly see utility lines run 3 to 4 feet from a tree,” hesaid. “People think trees have really deep root systems.Actually, they have really shallow root systems. When a tree’sroots grow and stretch, they often bust through concrete andasphalt along the way.”Hammond said cutting the roots isn’t the solution. This kills thetree and creates a bigger problem.”You don’t see these problems in production forestry,” he said.”We’re hoping this training program will serve as a startingpoint for spreading information and educating people on urbanforestry.”center_img After-the-fact help”Management techniques for trees are different in urban areas,”Hammond said. “Unfortunately, a lot of our agents deal withafter-the-fact management issues. They get more fertilization,health and water questions than selection questions.”Hammond said many urban forestry questions come from parks andrecreation crews, city government maintenance departments andhome developers.The county agents were trained in February. They are nowbeginning to train people in their counties. The grant fundsprovided each agent $300 worth of educational materials, such asreference books and CDs.The UGA Georgia Center for Urban Agriculture is seeking grantfunds now to present similar training programs on turf andlandscape management and water quality and quantity.last_img read more

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Engaging cardholders in the age of digital payments

By on December 17, 2020

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr According to statista.com, mobile payment revenue will top $1 trillion in 2019, up from $450 billion in 2015. Clearly, advances in mobile and digital tech are redefining payments. And the way members use your cards may never be the same.Here are five things your credit union needs to know in the age of digital payments:To members, “card on file” means “set it and forget it.”“Credit unions should incentivize members to establish their card as the default payment option across merchant apps and websites,” said Jennifer Kerry, VP/credit card services for CO-OP Financial Services. “Consumers typically only replace their default cards if there is an issue—which  means if your card is not loaded into a member’s Starbucks app, you may never help buy that member a cup of coffee again.”Future payments will be increasingly automated.Emerging in-store payment technologies are making it even more important for your cards to be “on file.” Imagine your members walking into an Amazon Go store, selecting their goods and leaving—without visiting a cashier or interacting with a terminal—and without giving one thought as to which card they placed on file. That is where payments are headed. continue reading »last_img read more

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Tioga County group celebrates anniversary of the 19th amendment

By on December 8, 2020

first_img“It brings you a sense of maybe what we’re doing now,” Knickerbocker said. “We’ll be known is history for something.” OWEGO (WBNG) — The Tioga County Women’s Suffrage Committee celebrated the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Speakers talked about how this movement impacted Tioga County and Susan B. Anthony even showed up. Christina Knickerbocker says it’s amazing this historic piece of history made it’s way to the county. Held at the Tioga County Office Building, the committee celebrated with books and pamphlets explaining the movement. last_img read more

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Unai Emery hails under-fire Granit Xhaka as leader for Arsenal

By on October 18, 2020

first_img Comment Coral BarrySaturday 14 Sep 2019 10:59 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link279Shares Emery defended his under-fire midfielder (Picture: Getty)‘Every player makes mistakes, only some are magnified because the consequence is more.‘But I am really focused on the good things, on the positive performances and Xhaka has a big character and is very important for us.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘He played a very good match against Tottenham, he made a mistake that was a penalty, he knows and we are working to improve, to change that mistake in one process.’ Advertisement Unai Emery hails under-fire Granit Xhaka as leader for Arsenalcenter_img Xhaka gave away a silly penalty against Tottenham (Picture: Getty)Xhaka captained Arsenal during the north London derby, but fans were left fuming with his recklessness.But Emery hailed Xhaka as a leader in his side and a crucial figure in his squad.‘Of course, he gives us a very good balance in the middle with the ball and without the ball,’ he said. ‘I think he is very important for us.‘We can talk about the defects for every player, for him also, but we can speak about positive things, the very positive performances he gives us in most matches.’MORE: Emiliano Martinez plans to dethrone Bernd Leno as Arsenal’s No.1 this seasonMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Advertisement Xhaka could be about to be named Arsenal captain (Picture: Getty)Unai Emery has defended Granit Xhaka after the midfielder’s performance against Tottenham.Xhaka gave away a penalty in a woeful display in the 2-2 draw with Spurs, but remains a candidate to be Arsenal’s new captain.Emery is poised to name a new skipper after the departure of Laurent Koscielny during the summer and said he spoke to Xhaka after his error against Tottenham.‘We’ve been speaking — mistake, recognise that mistake, learn, correct, improve and after repeat with success,’ Emery explained.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces New Methane Rules to Improve Air Quality, Reduce Industry Loss

By on October 17, 2020

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces New Methane Rules to Improve Air Quality, Reduce Industry Loss January 19, 2016 Energy,  Environment,  Government That Works,  Press Release,  Results Harrisburg, PA– Governor Tom Wolf today announced a nation-leading strategy to reduce emissions of methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change, and has been implicated in health risks. The plan is designed to protect the environment and public health, reduce climate change, and help businesses reduce the waste of a valuable product by reducing methane leaks and emissions from natural gas well sites, processing facilities, compressor stations and along pipelines“Pennsylvania is the second-largest producer of natural gas in the nation behind Texas,” said Governor Wolf. “We are uniquely positioned to be a national leader in addressing climate change while supporting and ensuring responsible energy development, creating new jobs, and protecting public health and our environment. These are commonsense steps that Pennsylvania can take to protect our air and reduce waste for industry. The best companies understand the business case for reducing methane leaks, as what doesn’t leak into the atmosphere can be used for energy production.”Methane, the primary component of natural gas, has been identified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the second-most prevalent greenhouse gas emitted in the United States from human activities. It has more than 28 to 36 times more warming power than carbon dioxide, according to data from the federal government.With federal estimates that the natural gas and oil industries account for a quarter of U.S. methane emissions, reducing methane leaks from the oil and gas sector is one of the essential steps needed for government to work with industry to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the impacts of climate change.Industry reported more than 5 million mcf (thousand cubic feet) – almost 115,000 tons — of methane emissions from unconventional wells and mid-stream operations in Pennsylvania in 2014. This is considered a low estimate, since fugitive emissions are difficult to quantify.“As the basis for our methane strategy, we’ve identified measures that the best companies in the industry are already employing, or that are required by the Federal government, or other states. These measures will pay for themselves in recovering saleable product that is otherwise lost,” said Department of Environmental Protection Secretary John Quigley.Pennsylvania will reduce emissions during development and gas production, processing, and transmission by requiring leak detection and repair (LDAR) measures, efficiency upgrades for equipment, improved processes, implementation of best practices, and more frequent use of leak-sensing technologies.The four-point plan:To reduce leaks at new unconventional natural gas well pads, DEP will develop a new general permit for oil and gas exploration, development, and production facilities, requiring Best Available Technology (BAT) for equipment and processes, better record-keeping, and quarterly monitoring inspections.To reduce leaks at new compressor stations and processing facilities, DEP will revise its current general permit, updating best-available technology requirements and applying more stringent LDAR, other requirements to minimize leaks. A new condition will require the use of Tier 4 diesel engines that reduce emissions of particulate matter and nitrous oxide by about 90%.To reduce leaks at existing oil and natural gas facilities, DEP will develop a regulation for existing sources for consideration by the Environmental Quality Board.To reduce emissions along production, gathering, transmission and distribution lines, DEP will establish best management practices, including leak detection and repair programs.For more information and technical details on the plan, DEP has prepared an explanatory white paper.DEP has scheduled a webinar for Wednesday, January 20 at 11:30 am to discuss these nation-leading measures. For more information, click here, and to register, click here.MEDIA CONTACTS: Jeff Sheridan, 717.783.1116# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Pennsylvania Provides First-Ever Dedicated Computer Science Funding to 765 Schools

By on October 16, 2020

first_img January 17, 2019 Pennsylvania Provides First-Ever Dedicated Computer Science Funding to 765 Schools Education,  PAsmart,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, PA – Building on his commitment to prepare students to use computers and technology in their careers, Governor Tom Wolf today announced $8.7 million in targeted grants to expand computer science classes and teacher training at 765 schools across the commonwealth.The targeted grants represent the next phase of the governor’s new and innovative PAsmart initiative, which will provide $20 million to bring high-quality computer science and STEM education in elementary, middle, and high schools, and professional development for teachers. With this commitment, Pennsylvania now ranks second in the country for investments in K-12 STEM and computer science.“Over the next decade, seven in ten new jobs in Pennsylvania will require workers to use computers and new technologies in a constantly changing economy,” said Governor Wolf. “With these grants more students will get the skills they need for emerging high-demand jobs.“Through these investments, we are building a well-trained workforce that will meet the needs of employers, strengthen the middle class, and grow the economy for everyone.”In addition to helping schools introduce and expand computer science programming, the targeted grants will provide greater opportunities for students of color, low-income students and girls to learn critical skills needed to succeed in today’s workforce.“Equity continues to be an area of focus for Pennsylvania’s schools by providing access and opportunities to all students regardless of zip code,” said Education Secretary Pedro Rivera. “The PAsmart targeted grants will help to address opportunity gaps, boosting participation among historically underserved and underrepresented student populations.”Targeted grant recipients include 221 school districts, two career and technical centers, and 18 charter and cyber charter schools, and eight intermediate units, each of which will receive $35,000. Additional funding in the $30 million PAsmart initiative for science and technology education, apprenticeships and job training will be announced in the coming weeks.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Gov. Wolf Tours State-Funded Aquaponics Lab That Teaches Students About Science and Leadership

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first_img November 13, 2019 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Gov. Wolf Tours State-Funded Aquaponics Lab That Teaches Students About Science and Leadershipcenter_img Education,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Camp Hill, PA – West Shore School District students led Governor Tom Wolf on a tour of a new aquaponics lab at Cedar Cliff High School today. Funded with a $250,000 grant awarded by the Wolf administration, the new lab provides hands-on learning for students across the school district to develop skills in science, business and leadership.“This new lab goes beyond teaching students about aquaculture and hydroponics to creating opportunities to learn about leadership, technology, and marketing,” said Governor Wolf. “This is another example of the workforce development strategies my administration is supporting to prepare future generations with the knowledge and skills to succeed and make Pennsylvania an attractive place for growing and emerging industries to do business.”The indoor lab constructed at the high school last summer combines conventional aquaculture, such as raising fish and other aquatic animals in tanks, and hydroponics, the production of plants in water rather than soil, into a symbiotic system used to grow fish, fruits, vegetables, feedstock, and other plant products all year.Students from all 14 West Shore School District schools will use the lab to learn about plant propagation, food production, and hydroponic plant growth. High school students are also using the lab for research in plant lighting manipulation, propagation techniques, crop rotation studies, and fish breeding and rearing practices.The aquaponics lab was one of 16 projects that received a total of $3.5 million in Strategic Innovation grants from the Department of Labor & Industry. The grants are awarded through Local Workforce Development Boards.“The Aquaponics Lab at Cedar Cliff High School is a catalyst for district-wide STEAM experiences and hands-on learning opportunities,” said West Shore School District Superintendent Dr. Todd Stoltz. “The investment made by the Department of Labor & Industry in our students’ future extends beyond aquaponics. We now have a variety of opportunities available not only to those students interested in a career in science, but also communications, education, technology, marketing, and finance. The impact this program is having on students individually and collectively, and in our local community, perhaps even global community, is a great source of district pride.”Investing in science and technology education is a priority for Governor Wolf. In addition to Strategic Innovation Grants, the governor launched the PAsmart workforce development initiative and secured $70 million over two years. PAsmart is providing $40 million for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) learning and computer science programs, and $30 million for apprenticeships and job training programs.Pennsylvania now ranks second in the nation for investments in computer science education and is third in the number of nationally recognized STEM ecosystems.last_img read more

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