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USDA aims to reduce Salmonella in meat and poultry

By on November 18, 2020

first_imgMar 6, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced a new initiative to reduce Salmonella contamination in raw meat and poultry, mainly by focusing more effort on processing facilities that need improvement and reporting test results faster.A steady increase in Salmonella in broiler chickens tested by the USDA since 2002 is among the reasons for the initiative, the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in announcing the program on Feb 23. About 16% of broiler samples tested positive in 2005.”Our goal is to work proactively to reduce the presence of Salmonella on raw products before plants develop a pattern of poor performance,” USDA Under Secretary for Food Safety Dr. Richard Raymond said in a news release. “FSIS will more quickly report testing results and target establishments needing improvement, providing timely information to both consumers and industry.”The FSIS said it will concentrate its resources on facilities with higher levels of Salmonella and will provide sample-by-sample test results to facilities as soon as they become available.Currently, firms receive results after a full set of samples is completed, which for broilers means after 51 consecutive days of sampling, officials said. Giving the results for each sample when they become available “will help establishments in their assessment of whether their slaughter dressing procedures are adequate for pathogen reduction,” the agency said.The FSIS also will begin posting the overall nationwide results of its Salmonella testing on its Web site each quarter, “to give consumers more complete and timely information about Salmonella trends.” Currently results are posted annually. The agency will begin posting the quarterly data soon after the end of the first quarter of this year, according FSIS spokesman Steve Cohen.In addition, the agency said it plans to identify Salmonella serotypes more quickly so it can notify meat firms and investigate illness outbreaks in coordination with health agencies. Serotypes are used to trace the sources of outbreaks of foodborne disease by matching pathogen strains found in patients with strains found in foods.The Salmonella initiative is patterned after a recent FSIS program to reduce the level of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef. The FSIS calls that program highly successful and says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that it led to a 40% reduction in E coli illness cases.The agency said experience has shown that processing plants that get special inspections are able to reduce Salmonella in their products. “Where FSIS has performed Food Safety Assessments (FSAs) in establishments that have persistently poor performance records for controlling Salmonella, there has been a dramatic reduction in the levels of Salmonella,” the agency reported.The USDA first set Salmonella standards for raw meat and poultry in 1996 when it launched the Pathogen Reduction/Hazard Analysis and critical Control Point rule. The FSIS collects and tests samples of seven categories of products: broilers, market hogs, cows and bulls, steer and heifers, ground beef, ground chicken, and ground turkey.The agency said the overall percentage of contaminated broilers is below the baseline level at the time the HACCP rule was established, but “the recent upward trend is of concern to the agency.”In 2005, 16.3% of the 9,592 broiler samples from processing plants of all sizes tested positive for Salmonella, according to the FSIS’s latest report. That compares with 13.5% in 2004, 12.8% in 2003, and 11.5% in 2002.Also in 2005, the agency found Salmonella in 32.4% of 145 tested samples of ground chicken and 23.2% of 925 samples of ground turkey. In 2004 the respective figures were 25.5% for ground chicken and 19.9% for ground turkey.Salmonella was found far less often in the other product categories in 2005: 3.7% for market hogs, 1.3% for cows and bulls, 0.6% for steers and heifers, and 1.1% for ground beef.For all product categories combined in 2005, the FSIS found Salmonella in 5.7% (2,322) of the 40,714 samples tested, according to the report.The FSIS is accepting comments on its new policy until May30. (See news release link below for information on where to submit comments.)See also:Feb 23 FSIS news releasehttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR_022306_01/index.aspFSIS report of Salmonella sampling results for 1998-2005http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Science/Progress_Report_Salmonella_Testing/index.aspAug 10, 2004, CIDRAP News story “USDA finding Salmonella less often in meat”last_img read more

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Dutch FA demands €5m from Barcelona to appoint Koeman

By on September 24, 2020

first_img Read Also: BREAKING: PSG reach first UCL final after thrashing Leipzig Indeed, Koeman arrived in Barcelona earlier on Tuesday with an official announcement possibly coming as early as Wednesday, should the clause be paid in that timeframe. Koeman delivered one of the Catalan club’s most famous moments as he hit the winning goal in the 1992 Champions League final against Sampdoria – Barcelona’s first ever triumph in the competition. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Barcelona must splash out about €4m-5m to the Dutch FA before appointing Netherlands national team boss Ronald Koeman, report La Vanguardia. The termination cause is likely to be paid by the manager himself after coming to a personal agreement with the Blaugrana over his salary, of which the payment will then be taken out of. The latest Barcelona news has centred on the replacement for Quique Setien, who was sacked as Barcelona boss on Monday after just seven months in the role with Koeman widely expected to be confirmed as Blaugrana boss in the coming hours. Barcelona’s General Director Òscar Grau is currently in Amsterdam to negotiate the contract termination with the Dutch FA. Promoted ContentSome Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That Exist7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your Mind8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Who Earns More Than Ronaldo?Best Car Manufacturers In The WorldHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!8 Best 1980s High Tech Gadgets9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo12 Stars You Would Never Recognize Without Their Signature Look20 Amazing Facts About The Daenerys Of The House Of TargaryenTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever Madecenter_img Loading… last_img read more

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Cassandra Cay (Wood) Hibbs, 73, Wellington: Jan. 17, 1943 – Aug. 29, 2016

By on August 14, 2020

first_imgCay HibbsCassandra Cay (Wood) Hibbs, 73, of Wellington died Monday, August 29, 2016 at Wellington Health and Rehab in Wellington, Kansas.The family will have a time to remember Cay at 10:00 A.M., Thursday, September 1, 2016 at the American Legion in Wellington. In lieu of flowers a memorial has been established with the Wellington Humane Society PO Box 494, Wellington, KS 67152 and may be left with the Shelley Family Funeral Home in Wellington. For further information please visit www.shelleyfamilyfh.com.Cay was born the daughter of William and Ramona (Patterson) Wood on January 17, 1943 in Wellington. On April 11, 1960 Cay and Richard Hibbs were united in marriage in Wellington, KS. Cay wore many hats in her life time. For many years she was employed by Walmart. Cay was an avid reader and enjoyed the company of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.Cay is survived by her mother, Ramona A. Wood, sister, Michele Reid and husband Charlie; daughter, Tanya Hibbs-Roberts and husband Dave; sons: Darren Hibbs, Corby Hibbs and wife Julie; grandchildren: Chandra and Chad Tate, Rusty (Lyndsey) Roberts, Ryan Roberts, Rachel (Matt) Mathia, Briawna Hibbs-Bain and husband Trevor, Deric Hibbs and wife Kylei, Abby and Chloe Hibbs and seven great grandchildren.She was preceded in death by her husband, Richard; her grandparents: Raymond and Ruth Patterson and E.E. and Mary Wood; her father, Bill Wood; brother, Buddy Wood and a niece, Chafney Reid.last_img read more

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