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Legislators may tighten mask enforcement at Indiana Statehouse

By on April 20, 2021

first_img Pinterest By Network Indiana – January 17, 2021 0 233 Twitter Pinterest Facebook Google+ IndianaLocalNews (Photo supplied/State Of Indiana) Legislators may tighten enforcement of mask requirements at the Indiana Statehouse:Lawmakers aren’t required to wear masks, though nearly all of them do. But masks are required for anyone else at the statehouse. Several people planning to testify at a Wednesday committee hearing ignored that order. Senate President Pro Tem Rod Bray (R-Martinsville) says legislators are talking to Capitol police about enforcing the requirement.As a coronavirus precaution, most committee hearings this year have legislators gathered in one room while witnesses and spectators are in another. Some people who had planned to testify at Wednesday’s hearing left rather than share the room with those defying the mask mandate. Bray and House Speaker Todd Huston (R-Fishers) says people who come to the statehouse need to feel safe there. Bray says the legislative staffers or interns who have been assigned to the witness rooms aren’t in a position to tell people to mask up.It’s not clear what Capitol police would do to enforce the order. Bray says he’d rather avoid kicking people out of the building. He says he hopes a firm reminder from a uniformed officer will get people to follow the mandate. And Bray says officers can also restore proper decorum at hearings. He says with the meeting split between two rooms, many of the unmasked activists who disagreed with someone’s testimony were talking back to the video feed and creating an unruly atmosphere.Legislators were debating a bill barring employers from requiring workers to get the coronavirus vaccine. Bray says the bill’s opponents may have undermined their cause — he says a vote on the bill was delayed because of the number of people who left without testifying. Legislators may tighten mask enforcement at Indiana Statehouse Previous articleIU Prof: Health , economic success go hand-in-hand in Hoosier stateNext articleBill would allow schools to access expunged criminal records of potential employees Network Indiana WhatsApp Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

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News story: Foreign Secretary meeting with Irish Foreign Minister

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first_img Media enquiries For journalists The Foreign Secretary and the Irish Foreign Minister discussed the importance of maintaining our regular engagement through, and beyond, the UK’s exit from the EU, recognising that the unique UK-Ireland relationship is epitomised by our historic ties, family bonds and people-to-people links.On foreign policy cooperation, the Foreign Ministers agreed that close cooperation between the UK and Ireland on mutual international objectives, including on the Middle East Peace Process, was vital.The two Ministers also expressed their mutual desire to reach a deal on the UK’s exit from the EU that works for everyone, as well as a shared commitment to avoiding a hard border.Further information Email [email protected] Follow the Foreign Secretary on Twitter @BorisJohnson and Facebook Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedInlast_img read more

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Press release: Carillion: Official Receiver’s update

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first_imgTo be notified of future updates from the Official Receiver please register to receive an email alert. We continue to discuss with potential purchases for Carillion’s remaining contracts, as well as remain committed to engaging with staff, elected employee representatives and unions as these arrangements are confirmed. Regrettably eight job losses are being announced and those leaving the business this week will be provided with every support to find new work by Jobcentre Plus’ Rapid Response Service. Secure on-going employment has been confirmed for a further 101 members of staff who are transferring to new suppliers, taking the total number of jobs saved to 11,739. In total, to date 11,739 jobs (64% of the pre-liquidation workforce) have been saved and 2,340 (13%) jobs have been made redundant through the liquidation A further 1,121 employees have left the business during the liquidation through finding new work, retirement or for other reasons This information does not include jobs attached to contracts where an intention to purchase has been entered into but has not yet formally occurred Just under 3,000 employees are currently retained to enable Carillion to deliver the remaining services it is providing for public and private sector customers until decisions are taken to transfer or cease these contracts Further information about rights in redundancy is available on gov.uk Further information A spokesperson for the Official Receiver said:last_img read more

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News story: CT Summer Security

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first_imgSpecialist advice for companies operating in crowded places, split into different sectors such as major events, sport stadia, visitor attractions, bars, theatres and shopping centres, is still available on the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NACTSO) website.Key advice for anyone attending an event this summer Withdrawn by NaCTSO,As the UK prepares to kick off the summer months with a busy May Bank Holiday weekend filled with festivals, concerts and sporting events; police security experts will again be working in partnership with event organisers to ensure that safety and security remains top of the agenda.Launched for the first time last year in response to the terror attacks in both London and Manchester, ‘Summer Security’ has already delivered advice, best practice and training to thousands of festival workers, staff and security guards across the UK.This year, experts from Counter Terrorism Policing will once again be working in partnership with organisers at major entertainment and sporting venues up and down the country to ensure that thousands more staff will be able to minimise the chance of attacks and mitigate the impact they can have.While there is no intelligence to indicate an increased threat to summer events, the new National Coordinator for Protect and Prepare Policing, T/Chief Superintendent Nick Aldworth, wants the public to familiarise themselves with the existing safety information so they too, can play a part in the UK’s collective security.T/Chief Superintendent Aldworth said: You can follow and support the campaign at @terrorismpolice using #ActionCountersTerrorism. Summer Security is all about making sure people can enjoy themselves safe in the knowledge that the staff around them are trained to know what to do should the worst happen. Sadly we have seen that these big public events and crowded spaces can be targeted by those who want to cause harm, but I want to reassure the public that the police, partners and the event organisers are doing all we can to keep them safe and secure. You can help make these events safer by reading our Run, Hide, Tell advice, and to be ready to ACT if you spot suspicious behaviour and activity. Don’t think you might be wasting our time, it is always better to be safe than sorry. If something doesn’t look or feel right, tell someone. Please arrive early for extra security measures. This will help prevent delays in getting into the event. Be patient with security checks and help the staff to help you. We know it is inconvenient but they are there to keep you safe. It is essential that you do not bring unnecessary items to the event; this will help to speed up searches and your entry to the event. If you spot someone acting suspiciously, report it to police or to security staff immediately: don’t leave it to someone else. #ActionCountersTerrorism In an emergency, if you think there is an immediate risk, always call 999 and look around you for help from staff – especially those with radios who can raise the alarm quickly. Don’t leave bags unattended or anywhere they could cause a security scare. And never agree to look after anyone else’s bags, no matter how plausible their story. If there is an incident, listen to staff and any announcements. Organisers will have emergency plans to help you keep safe. Remember, the chance of being caught in a terrorism incident is small. But if it happens – Run, Hide, Tell gov.uk/ACTlast_img read more

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News story: DASA Defence Logistics Hackathon

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first_imgThe Defence Logistics hackathon will be taking place on 29-30 November 2018 in Central London.We are looking to bring together the best from academia, industry and government in the defence and security arena.This hackathon will focus on accelerating Logistics Decision Support through exploiting Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Machine Learning (ML) capabilities.The intent of this hackathon is to demonstrate the ability to analyse and share structured and unstructured multi-source data; maintaining its classification and permission based access rules at machine speed. Data sets from the C130J Hercules platform will be provided to enable the development and testing of potential sharing solutions. The longer-term aim will be the development of predictive maintenance tools, and provides evidence based recommendations to optimise inventory checks and extend the life of components.This event will require programmers and coders at the leading edge of current technology to develop an AI/ML capability that can be accessed, interrogated and translated to provide better informed and timely decision support across national and multinational domains.This event will provide a great opportunity to demonstrate your ability to solve current Defence Logistic challenges, as well as the opportunity to network with senior decision makers and end users within this area. Following the event you will be invited to submit a fully costed proposal which could lead to securing funding to further develop your product.To register for the event, please visit the Eventbrite page. Further information now available about this hackathon If you have any questions then please email [email protected] with the title Defence Logistics hackathon in the subject line.last_img read more

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Speech: “Deterrence in the Cyber Age” speech by the Foreign Secretary

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first_imgI’m delighted to be here at Glasgow University.For centuries, this City and its University have been at the forefront of science, technology and medicine. The modern disciplines of physics and economics – and the Industrial Revolution itself – find their origins here. There could be no better setting for a speech about the challenges presented by the advance of new technology.Just occasionally, even a Conservative Foreign Secretary should break with tradition, so I propose to begin by quoting the late Tony Benn.In his book “Arguments for Democracy”, Benn wrote: “If one meets a powerful person ask them five questions: “What power have you got? Where did you get it from? In whose interests do you exercise it? To whom are you accountable? And how can we get rid of you’?”And the final question is by far the most salient.“If you cannot get rid of the people who govern you,” Benn wrote, “you do not live in a democratic system”.And he was right, of course.The freedom to pass judgement on your leaders and change your government peacefully, through the ballot box, is the defining quality of a liberal democracy.Millions of people have made immense sacrifices for the sake of that essential liberty.Exactly 3 decades ago, the year 1989 saw the fastest advance of liberal democracy in history.On 4th June, a free election in Poland triggered the fall of the Iron Curtain.Within a decade, another 16 countries had broken the chains of dictatorship.But what the Poles, Czechs and many others did not have to contend with in 1989 was the reality of cyber technology, a hugely powerful force for openness and transparency, but one that also possesses a dark side, capable of being used to subvert the very democratic processes we hold dear.Deterrence in the Cyber AgeThreats to democracy in cyber ageSo far, we’ve seen no successful interference in UK elections or referenda.Yet in the cyber age, an authoritarian regime armed with nothing more ambitious than a laptop computer could try to manipulate our democracy.In his book, The Perfect Weapon, David Sanger wrote that North Korea’s leadership went from “viewing the internet as a threat to viewing it as a brilliant invention for levelling the playing field with the West”.Events have demonstrated how our adversaries regard free elections – and the very openness of a democratic system – as key vulnerabilities to be exploited.In 2014, it was widely reported that Russian hackers calling themselves “CyberBerkut” tried to undermine the presidential election in Ukraine, including by tampering with the vote-counting system and delaying the final result. Last October, the British Government publicly confirmed that this group acts for Russia’s GRU military intelligence service.In 2016, the GRU targeted the United States, penetrating the email accounts of the national committee of the party that was then in control of the White House, before leaking information with the obvious aim of damaging its presidential candidate.For every example of publicly attributed interference, there have been others that never saw the light of day.Whilst we cannot know for sure the effect of these operations, the material fact is that the Russian state has tried to subvert democracy.And the implications are profoundly disturbing.At a minimum, trust in the democratic process is seriously undermined.But in a worst case scenario, elections could become tainted exercises, robbing the Governments they produce of legitimacy.And the greatest risk of all is that a hostile state might succeed in casting a permanent cloud of doubt over an entire democratic system.The uncomfortable truth of the cyber age is that authoritarian regimes possess ways of undermining free societies that yesterday’s dictators would have envied.During both World Wars – and despite the risk of invasion – British democratic institutions remained strong enough to remove Prime Ministers and change governments, in accordance with Tony Benn’s rule. Through every year of conflict, Parliament continued to hold by-elections without fear of outside interference.Yet in the cyber era, hostile states wouldn’t need to fight wars or expend blood and treasure to subvert democracy. At long range and minimal cost – perhaps without even being discovered – their cyber experts could inject propaganda into an election campaign and target swing voters, in order to favour one party over another. In a country with an electronic voting system, they could potentially manipulate the result itself.Democracy can never be taken for granted but in the cyber age, the message is clear: Britain and other democracies need a strategic approach to safeguard the free institutions at the heart of our way of life.Cyber deterrenceThe UK is one of the leading cyber powers in the world and GCHQ possesses extraordinary expertise, benefiting every part of the country.One of the reasons for that expertise is the great knowledge-base of our universities and I was very proud to visit the School of Computing Science here at Glasgow University.Along with our allies, we have improved our collective ability to detect those responsible for malign actions in cyberspace, including election interference.The Government has a £1.9 billion programme to protect British infrastructure and systems from cyber threats.The National Cyber Security Centre is doing excellent work to help safeguard British companies and institutions.But we must go further.Simply making it harder for our adversaries to inflict damage in cyberspace won’t be sufficient on its own.Nor will verbal condemnation or written agreements create the taboo we should seek for the manipulation of democratic elections.In 2013 and again in 2015, a UN Group of Governmental Experts affirmed that international law and the UN Charter applied to cyberspace, including the prohibition on interference in domestic affairs, which must cover elections.Ironically, Russia was among the countries in the UN General Assembly that endorsed these reports. But treating the symptoms is never as effective as dealing with the cause.We need a strategy that deters hostile states from intervening in free elections in the first place, a new doctrine of deterrence against cyber attacks in our democracies.The very word “deterrence” summons images of nuclear-tipped confrontation between superpowers during the Cold War.Henry Kissinger once wrote that a “new order of experience requires new ways of thinking” – and that is certainly true of the cyber age.Today’s tools are different from those of the Cold War and our responses must be different too.The British Government’s starting point is that we must impose a price on malicious cyber activity, including interference in elections, sufficient to deter authoritarian states. We won’t always react identically to every individual incident and a cyber attack will not necessarily encounter a cyber response.Instead, our approach to cyber deterrence has 4 principles.First, we will always seek to discover which state or other actor was behind any malign cyber activity, overcoming any efforts to conceal their tracks.Secondly, we will respond. That could include naming and shaming the perpetrator in public, in concert with our allies, exposing not only who carried out the action but, so far as possible, how it was done, thereby helping the cyber security industry to develop protective measures.Thirdly, we will aim to prosecute those who conduct cyber crime, demonstrating they are not above the law.And finally, with our allies we will consider further steps, consistent with international law, to make sure we don’t just manage current cyber attacks but deter future ones as well.Naming and shamingNow one of the most powerful tools is the sunlight of transparency.The British Government has already exposed a series of incidents, including the Russian cyber attacks in Ukraine, North Korea’s infection of thousands of computers with ransomware – including the computers of 48 NHS Trusts – the targeting of 300 universities by an Iranian group, and the theft of commercial data by hackers acting for China’s Ministry of State Security.In every case, Britain made these attributions in the company of our allies. Fourteen countries joined us to expose China’s actions; 19 publicised the operations of the GRU.But a doctrine of deterrence will require us to go further.The perpetrators must believe they run a credible risk of additional counter-measures – economic and diplomatic – over and above public embarrassment.The European Union has agreed that economic sanctions, including travel bans and asset freezes, could be imposed to punish malicious action in cyber space.Last October, Britain helped secure a decision by EU leaders to create a new sanctions regime for this express purpose. After Brexit, the UK will be able to impose cyber-related sanctions on a national basis.As for diplomatic penalties, we won’t hesitate to highlight any breaches of international agreements, such as when the operation by China’s Ministry of State Security broke a bilateral agreement with the UK and a commitment from every G20 country not to conduct or support malicious activity of this kind.Finally, Britain now has a National Offensive Cyber Programme, delivered by a Joint Mission between GCHQ and the Ministry of Defence.The UK has already conducted offensive cyber operations against Daesh terrorists in the Middle East, designed to hinder their ability to carry out attacks, protect British and coalition forces, and cripple Daesh’s online propaganda.The coalition to deter malign behaviour in cyber space and defend democracy needs to be as broad as possible.So the Foreign Office has 50 ‘Cyber Attaches’ in British embassies around the world, charged with working alongside their host governments to raise the cost of malicious cyber activity and safeguard a free and secure internet.We will increase their number by a further eight as we take forward the expansion of Britain’s diplomatic network. And today, we are helping over 100 countries to strengthen their cyber security, partially funded through our overseas aid budget. Among them are Commonwealth members, from Botswana to Jamaica, building on the Cyber Declaration agreed in London last year.ConclusionGradually, and none too soon, the democracies of the world are joining forces to improve our response to the cyber manipulation of elections.But after multiple recent attempts, we can no longer afford to wait until an authoritarian regime demonstrably succeeds in changing the outcome of an election and weakening trust in the integrity of democracy itself.The risk is that after just a few cases, a pall of suspicion would descend over a democratic process – and once that happens, the damage would be difficult, perhaps impossible, to repair.So now is the time for Britain and our allies to act together to protect democracy in the cyber age by deterring those who would do us harm.Let me close with the words of a late Rector of this University, William Gladstone, who campaigned to extend the franchise with this phrase: “You cannot fight against the future. Time is on our side.”We too cannot resist the future represented by the cyber age.But we must safeguard the ability of the British people, secured by Gladstone and many others, to vote in a free and fair election safe from outside sabotage.last_img read more

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Official Statistics: Sex ratios at birth in Great Britain: 2013 to 2017

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first_imgThis report analyses male to female birth ratios in Great Britain for the period 2013 to 2017, alongside a breakdown by mother’s country of birth and ethnicity of the child.The report should be read alongside the complete data set.This analysis will show whether any group is found to have a birth sex ratio that is different from the naturally expected range, to indicate evidence or absence of evidence of sex selection occurring in Great Britain.last_img

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Premier Foods chairman leaves company

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first_imgRonnie Bell, the chairman of under-fire Premier Foods, has stepped down from his role after 21 months.The board has appointed senior independent director, David Beever, to take on the chairman’s role in the group, which is the parent company behind Rank Hovis.Commenting on his decision, Bell said: “I’m delighted that we now have the right management, strategic and financial foundations in place to drive Premier Foods’ return to growth. Having set a course to turn the company around, I believe it is an appropriate time to step down. I’m confident that, with Michael Clarke at the helm, the company has a bright future. I’m also very grateful to David Beever for stepping in as chairman to ensure the necessary continuity.”The board has appointed non-executive director Ian McHoul to take over as senior independent director, once David Beever becomes chairman.last_img read more

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Duffingate: Starbucks won’t stop anyone baking them

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first_imgIt gives a whole new meaning to a bun fight.When Starbucks launched its new doughnut and muffin hybrid last week (see the British Baker story here), called the duffin, it probably thought it was on to a good thing.However, the internet erupted yesterday, when a baker with a small chain of shops in London said she had invented the tasty treat. The duffin is a sticky combination of muffin and doughnut that is baked, dipped in melted butter and then coated in sugar.Bea Vo, owner of Bea’s of Bloomsbury, said she was shocked to discover that the duffin had been successfully trademarked last month by pastry supplier Rich Products, which developed the treat for Starbucks UK.So she took her angst to Twitter – accusing the coffee shop supplier of preventing her from making the treat. She said her recipe has been available in her book for the past three years.In a tweet to British Baker, she said: “@MartynBBmag @StarbucksUK @RichsNews by owning trademark they reserve right to prevent me from selling duffins. Point of trademark.”Not so, said Starbucks.In a statement, Ian Cranna, VP Marketing & Category for Starbucks UK, said: “Since launching the Starbucks Duffin we have discovered there are other Duffins being created and enjoyed in the UK. Rich Products, who created our Duffin has trademarked the name in the UK. However, neither Starbucks nor Rich Products has at any time suggested that we will attempt to stop Bea’s of Bloomsbury selling their own Duffins.”However, Vo replied: “It’s obvious, I think, where their duffin was inspired from. They should just give credit where credit is due and not claim it for themselves.”last_img read more

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